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4.8.19 Wired
"THE PLAN TO SAVE THE RHINO WITH A CERVIX-NAVIGATING ROBOT"
Because of habitat loss and poaching, the northern white rhino is nearing obliteration, extinct in the wild with just two females--who aren't even reproductively viable--left in captivity. But now the San Diego Zoo has partnered with roboticists at UC San Diego to pursue a new solution: a snakelike robot to navigate that chaotic cervix and deposit an embryo in the uterus. If it works, it could mean the salvation of the northern white rhino.

3.31.19 San Diego Business Journal
"Screen-Printed Sensors Can Pinpoint Fentanyl"
U.S. Defense Department funds helped a research team at UC San Diego develop an inexpensive way to test for fentanyl, the headline-grabbing opioid that can be 50 times stronger than morphine -- or even stronger. According to the university, the screen-printed sensors offer a way for first responders to detect the drug that is faster, cheaper and more convenient compared with more conventional methods. Even a postal carrier could use it in the field, according to the university.

3.28.19 Xconomy
"Biolinq Adds $4.75M to Advance Glucose Monitoring Biosensor Patch"
Biosensor startup Biolinq said Thursday it has raised $4.75 million from new investors following the results of a clinical study of its experimental biomarker monitoring device. Founders Jared Tagney and Joshua Windmiller, who met while in grad school at UC San Diego, started the company in 2012 as Electrozyme. The company began focusing on the technology it is currently developing in 2015, Tagney said. It's seeking to commercialize a nickel-sized patch that's designed to gauge blood-glucose level and take other measurements when the device is applied to the skin.

3.22.19 Blocks & Files
"UC San Diego: Optane is great but...different"
Researchers at UC San Diego put the Intel Optane DC Persistent Memory Module through its paces and found that application performance varies widely. But the overall picture is that of a boost in performance from using Optane DIMMs. The same is true for the byte-addressable memory mapped mode, where performance for RocksDB increases 3.5 times, while Redis 3.2 gains just 20 per cent. Understanding the root causes of these differences is likely to be fertile ground for developers and researchers, the UC San Diego team notes.

3.20.19 HPC Wire
"What's New in HPC Research: TensorFlow, Buddy Compression, Intel Optane & More"
TensorFlow - an emerging open-source framework that supports using distributed applications on heterogeneous hardware - is gaining popularity for ML applications. In this paper - written by a team from KTH Royal Institute of Technology, South Park Commons, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory - the authors discuss the viability of TensorFlow for running HPC workloads on supercomputers. They design four traditional benchmark HPC applications and demonstrate that TensorFlow can take full advantage of high-performance networks and accelerators.

3.20.19 Science Node
"The robots that dementia caregivers want"
Building robots that can help people with dementia has been a longtime goal for roboticists. Yet until now, no one has sought to survey informal caregivers, such as family members, about what characteristics and roles these robots should have. A team of scientists at the University of California San Diego (UC San Diego) attempted to address this by spending six months co-designing robots with family members, social workers, and other caregivers.

3.19.19 Forbes
"Game-Changing Memory And Solid State Storage Technologies Integral To Intel's Long-Term Vision"
Intel is often identified solely by its various processor lines, but it most certainly is not a one-trick pony. Intel has made a concerted effort recently to spread the word regarding its 5G aspirations, but networking (both wired and wireless), I/O, FPGAs, core logic, power management, memory and storage technologies are all major, long-term focuses for the company as well -- essentially anything that hangs-off of a CPU or complements it in some way is fair game. Today, an editorial written by Rob Crooke, SVP and General Manager of the Non-Volatile Memory (NVM) Solutions Group at Intel

3.19.19 ECN Magazine
"The Robots That Dementia Caregivers Want: Robots for Joy, Robots for Sorrow"
Building robots that can help people with dementia has been a longtime goal for roboticists. Yet until now, no one has sought to survey informal caregivers, such as family members, about what characteristics and roles these robots should have. A team of scientists at the University of California San Diego sought to address this by spending six months co-designing robots with family members, social workers, and other caregivers who care for people with dementia. They are presenting their findings at the Human Robot Interaction conference March 11 to 14 in South Korea.

3.19.19 Medgadget
"Caregivers Want Robots to Take Care of Annoying Dementia Sufferers"
People with dementia, as well as those that take care of them, can benefit from a bit of robotic assistance. There are a few robots on the market that are designed to help elderly people around the house, but not too much exists for those suffering from cognitive decline. While there's been development in this field, researchers at the University of California, San Diego wanted to find out what kinds of robots would actually help. The team brought together a group of caregivers that have a good deal of experience with dementia patients.

3.18.19 The Next Platform
"RESEARCHERS SCRUTINIZE OPTANE MEMORY PERFORMANCE"
When Intel starts shipping its "Cascade Lake" Xeons in volume soon, it will mark a turning point in the server space. But not for processors - for memory. The Cascade Lake Xeon SP will be the first chip to support Intel's Optane DC Persistent Memory, a product that will pioneer a new memory tier that occupies the performance and capacity gap between DRAM and SSDs. Like Intel's Optane SSDs, Optane DC Persistent Memory Modules (PMM) are equipped with 3D XPoint, a non-volatile memory technology co-developed by Intel and Micron.

3.18.19 Medical Press
"The robots that dementia caregivers want: robots for joy, robots for sorrow"
Building robots that can help people with dementia has been a longtime goal for roboticists. Yet until now, no one has sought to survey informal caregivers, such as family members, about what characteristics and roles these robots should have. A team of scientists at the University of California San Diego sought to address this by spending six months co-designing robots with family members, social workers, and other caregivers who care for people with dementia. They are presenting their findings at the Human Robot Interaction conference March 11 to 14 in South Korea.

3.18.19 The Science Times
"The robots that dementia caregivers want: robots for joy, robots for sorrow"
Building robots that can help people with dementia has been a longtime goal for roboticists. Yet until now, no one has sought to survey informal caregivers, such as family members, about what characteristics and roles these robots should have. A team of scientists at the University of California San Diego sought to address this by spending six months co-designing robots with family members, social workers, and other caregivers who care for people with dementia. They are presenting their findings at the Human Robot Interaction conference March 11 to 14 in South Korea.

3.15.19 ABC 10 News San Diego
"UC San Diego researchers create new way to field test for Fentanyl"
Researchers at UC San Diego have developed a new way to field test for Fentanyl, a dangerous opioid that is deadly even in trace amounts. Similar to diabetes testing strips that measure glucose levels, the scientists at the Center for Wearable Sensors created a testing strip that can detect Fentanyl. "You simply swipe the surface and collect the sample and analyze it in one or two minutes, on the spot," says Joseph Wang, the Center's Director.

3.14.19 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Huge surge in foreign students helping UC San Diego diversity and pay its bills"
Yuan Gao was quick to say yes when a message arrived from UC San Diego offering him admission to a campus 7,000 miles from his home in southeast China. "It has a supercomputer," said Gao, a freshman who studies data science. "Not many schools have that. It'll help me become what I want to be." Reeling from reduced state funding, UC San Diego decided to heavily recruit international students, primarily because they pay at least twice as much as California residents in tuition and fees. The university says the money helps subsidize the cost of educating Californians,

3.14.19 IEEE Spectrum
"A Peek into the Future of Wearables"
Sitting near me in a Stanford University conference room last month was someone wearing the latest Apple Watch. It seemed like the latest in wearable tech when the Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Conference started--not so much a few hours later. That's because the advances in hardware and software discussed by researchers and entrepreneurs on the stage are already, at minimum, laboratory prototypes. An example includes chemical-sensing smart glasses being developed by the team of Joseph Wang, director of the Center for Wearable Sensors at UC San Diego.

3.9.19 The San Diego Union Tribune
"How to better recycle all those batteries? This UCSD professor has some ideas"
In an increasingly high-tech world where smartphones are ubiquitous and the growth in the number of electric vehicles on the road is expected to explode, scientists and engineers are trying to solve a big problem: How to recycle the batteries that make all of those things work. The U.S. Department of Energy recently launched its first lithium-ion recycling hub, called the ReCell Center, and a UC San Diego professor will add his expertise in the campaign to help the United States grow a competitive recycling industry and reduce the country's reliance on foreign sources of battery materials.

3.8.19 Dark Daily
"University of California San Diego Researchers Demonstrates How Easily Medical Laboratory Systems and Devices Can Be Compromised, Putting Patient Live"
Medical laboratory information systems (LIS) and similar devices are vulnerable to hacking, according to physicians and computer scientists from the University of California San Diego (UCSD) and the University of California Davis (UCD). They recently completed a study that exposed the vulnerabilities of these systems and revealed how clinical laboratory test results can be manipulated and exploited to put patient lives at risk.

3.7.19 Science News
"Nanosponges sop up toxins and help repair tissues"
To take his fledgling lab to new heights, Liangfang Zhang hatched a plan that he considered brilliant in its simplicity. It involved procedures that many of his peers found a little out there. But if he could make his idea work, it would clear a major hurdle to safely ferry therapies through the body on nanoparticles one-thousandth the width of a human hair.

3.7.19 C&EN
"New method for field detection of fentanyl"
Fentanyl, an extremely potent synthetic opioid, has flooded the illicit drug market in the US. First responders arriving at the scene of an overdose, or law enforcement officers conducting drug searches, need to know what compounds they're dealing with to avoid potentially dangerous exposures. In an effort to provide a cost-effective, field-compatible method to detect fentanyl, UC San Diego researchers have developed an electrochemical sensor that takes as little as one minute to identify the drug.

2.28.19 NBC
"UCSD Students Modernize Tijuana's Emergency Response System"
An app being developed by students could help to save countless lives in Mexico. In Tijuana, 13 ambulances serve a city of almost 1.7 million people. They are run by Cruz Roja, of the Red Cross. The ambulances are dispatched by radios but are not tracked in real time, making effective dispatching a challenge. This can slow down patients' access to emergency care at a time when they need it the most.Students at UC San Diego?s Jacobs School of Engineering are creating a mobile application that will change that.

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