Press Clips RSS Feed Recent News Clips

View News Clips by Year:
2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

7.10.19 Republic World
"This Artificial Intelligence (AI) Tool Can Flag Spoilers In Online Reviews Of Books, Movies And TV Shows"
"Spoilers are everywhere on the internet and are very common on social media. As internet users, we understand the pain of spoilers, and how they can ruin one's experience," said Ndapa Nakashole, a professor at the University of California San Diego in the US.

7.10.19 Geek
"Neural Network Trained to Spot Spoilers"
Researchers after my own heart have developed an AI-based system that can flag spoilers in online reviews of books and TV shows. A team from the University of California San Diego will present their findings at the upcoming Association for Computational Linguistics annual meeting in Italy. "Spoilers are everywhere on the Internet, and are very common on social media," senior study author Ndapa Nakashole, computer science professor at UC San Diego, said in a statement. "As Internet users, we understand the pain of spoilers, and how they can ruin one's experience."

7.9.19 Alvarado News
"Dragonfish have 'invisible' teeth to help them sneak up on their prey"
Deep-sea fish have evolved transparent teeth which, along with their black bodies, make them invisible to prey. Marc Meyers at the University of California San Diego and his colleagues have discovered what makes these teeth almost entirely transparent. Using an electron microscope, they found that the teeth contain grain-sized nanocrystals spread throughout the enamel. Materials are transparent when light can pass through them with little scattering, and because these structures in the surface of the teeth are so small, they don't scatter or reflect much light.

7.9.19 The Times of India
"This artifical intelligence tool will spot spoilers for you"
Scientists have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) based system that can flag spoilers in online reviews of books and TV shows. "Spoilers are everywhere on the internet, and are very common on social media. As internet users, we understand the pain of spoilers, and how they can ruin one's experience," said Ndapa Nakashole, a professor at the University of California San Diego in the US.

7.9.19 Tech Crunch
"Spoiler warning! This neural network spots dangerous reviews before you read them"
It's hard to avoid spoilers on the internet these days -- even if you're careful, a random tweet or recommended news item could lay to waste your plan to watch that season finale a day late or catch a movie after the crowds have subsided. But soon an AI agent may do the spoiler-spotting for you, and flag spoilerific reviews and content before you even have a chance to look. SpoilerNet is the creation of a team at UC San Diego, composed perhaps of people who tried waiting a week to see Infinity War and got snapped for their troubles. Never again!

7.9.19 Chicago Tribune
"Neuroscience and artificial intelligence can help improve each other"
Despite their names, AI technologies and their component systems, such as artificial neural networks, don't have much to do with real brain science. I'm a professor of bioengineering and neurosciences interested in understanding how the brain works as a system - and how we can use that knowledge to design and engineer new machine learning models. In recent decades, brain researchers have learned a huge amount about the physical connections in the brain and about how the nervous system routes information and processes it. (Gabriel A. Silva, University of California San Diego)

7.9.19 CT Post
"Neuroscience and artificial intelligence can help improve each other"
(Gabriel A. Silva, University of California San Diego) Despite their names, artificial intelligence technologies and their component systems, such as artificial neural networks, don't have much to do with real brain science. I'm a professor of bioengineering and neurosciences interested in understanding how the brain works as a system - and how we can use that knowledge to design and engineer new machine learning models.

7.9.19 Seattle PI
"Neuroscience and artificial intelligence can help improve each other"
Gabriel A. Silva, University of California San Diego (THE CONVERSATION) Despite their names, artificial intelligence technologies and their component systems, such as artificial neural networks, don't have much to do with real brain science. I'm a professor of bioengineering and neurosciences interested in understanding how the brain works as a system - and how we can use that knowledge to design and engineer new machine learning models. In recent decades, brain researchers have learned a huge amount about the physical connections in the brain and about how the nervous system routes

7.9.19 Times Union
"Neuroscience and artificial intelligence can help improve each other"
Gabriel A. Silva, University of California San Diego (THE CONVERSATION) Despite their names, artificial intelligence technologies and their component systems, such as artificial neural networks, don?t have much to do with real brain science. I?m a professor of bioengineering and neurosciences interested in understanding how the brain works as a system ? and how we can use that knowledge to design and engineer new machine learning models. In recent decades, brain researchers have learned a huge amount about the physical connections in the brain and about how the nervous system routes

7.9.19 SF Gate
"Neuroscience and artificial intelligence can help improve each other"
Gabriel A. Silva, University of California San Diego (THE CONVERSATION) Despite their names, artificial intelligence technologies and their component systems, such as artificial neural networks, don't have much to do with real brain science. I'm a professor of bioengineering and neurosciences interested in understanding how the brain works as a system - and how we can use that knowledge to design and engineer new machine learning models. In recent decades, brain researchers have learned a huge amount about the physical connections in the brain and about how the nervous system routes

7.9.19 Houston Chronicle
"Neuroscience and artificial intelligence can help improve each other"
Gabriel A. Silva, University of California San Diego (THE CONVERSATION) Despite their names, artificial intelligence technologies and their component systems, such as artificial neural networks, don't have much to do with real brain science. I'm a professor of bioengineering and neurosciences interested in understanding how the brain works as a system - and how we can use that knowledge to design and engineer new machine learning models.

7.8.19 Tech Xplore
"Hate spoilers? This AI tool spots them for you"
Did social media spoil the Avengers' Endgame movie for you? Or maybe one of the Game of Thrones books? A team of researchers from the University of California San Diego is working to make sure that doesn't happen again. They have developed an AI-based system that can flag spoilers in online reviews of books and TV shows. "Spoilers are everywhere on the internet, and are very common on social media. As internet users, we understand the pain of spoilers, and how they can ruin one's experience," said Ndapa Nakashole, a professor of computer science at UCSD and one of the paper's senior author

7.8.19 Science News
"Hate spoilers? This AI tool spots them for you"
Did social media spoil the Avengers' Endgame movie for you? Or maybe one of the Game of Thrones books? A team of researchers from the University of California San Diego is working to make sure that doesn't happen again. They have developed an AI-based system that can flag spoilers in online reviews of books and TV shows. "Spoilers are everywhere on the internet, and are very common on social media. As internet users, we understand the pain of spoilers, and how they can ruin one's experience," said Ndapa Nakashole, a professor of computer science at UCSD and one of the paper's senior author

7.1.19 India West
"Indian American College Students Vaun Govil, Anika Kumar, Vardhaan Ambati Named 2019 Strauss Scholars"
At least three Indian American collegiate students in California have been awarded with a $15,000 scholarship from the Donald A. Strauss Foundation. Among the recipients is U.C. San Diego bioengineering student Varun Govil.

6.28.19 Naval Sea Systems Command
"San Diego team redesigns submarine for 2019 races"
The University of California San Diego (UCSD) brought their submarine, the Santiana, cross-country to compete in the 15th International Human-Powered Submarine Races at Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division in West Bethesda, Maryland.

6.27.19 Gut Microbiota for Health
"Discussion with Rob Knight on the World Microbiome Day 2019"
On June 27th is the World Microbiome Day; on this occasion GMFH editors took time to interview Dr. Rob Knight, the founding Director of the Center for Microbiome Innovation and Professor of Pediatrics at the University of California San Diego, about some key aspects of gut microbiota and how microbes could help mitigate the raise of antibiotic resistance.

6.26.19 Wired
"WHAT COULD POSSIBLY BE COOLER THAN ROBOBEE? ROBOBEE X-WING"
THEY USED TO call it RoboBee--a flying machine half the size of a paperclip that could flap its pair of wings 120 times a second. It was always tethered to a power source, limiting its freedom. Now, though, RoboBee becomes RoboBee X-Wing, as Harvard researchers have added solar cells and an extra pair of wings, freeing the robot to blast off to a galaxy far, far away. Or at least partway across the room, as it can sustain flight for only half a second, and only indoors. But hey, baby steps. The teeniest of quadrotors measure a few inches across and weigh a third of an ounce.

6.25.19 Voice of San Diego
"Culture Report: Happy Stories in a Trauma-Obsessed World"
For the last few years, themes of TranscenDANCE's annual youth summer intensive program have encouraged students to dig into dark issues. Resilience, assault, oppression and more inspired choreography -- and group discussions -- that had students facing trauma and troubling stories of their past or their communities. "Last year, our show was on mental health, so there was a lot of heavy thematics, things like sexual assault, the MeToo movement and things like depression and suicide," said Cat Corral, cofounder and executive artistic director of TranscenDANCE.

6.21.19 Scientific American
"Antiperspirant Boosts Armpit and Toe-Web Microbial Diversity"
Rather than wiping microbes out, antiperspirants and foot powders increased the diversity of microbial flora in armpits and between toes. Christopher Intagliata reports. You hear a lot about how what you eat will affect your microbiome. Probiotics. Prebiotics. Stuff like that. But your skin is swarming with microbes too--and the grooming products you use might affect what's living there. That's according to a study in the journal BMC Biology. [Amina Bouslimani et al., The impact of skin care products on skin chemistry and microbiome dynamics]

6.21.19 The Robot Report
"Survey: biggest robotics stories during first half of 2019"
It's crazy to think about, but we're just about halfway through 2019. And there's been a lot to talk about. There's been some bad news, of course. Companies such as Anki, Aria Insights (CyPhy Works) and others have closed their doors. But other companies such as Robust AI, which was founded in part by Rodney Brooks and Henrik Christensen, are getting started. There's also been many surprises, including Boston Dynamics' acquisition of Kinema Systems as it entered the logistics market and new warehouse robots from Amazon.

View News Clips by Year: 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002