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Computer scientists combine computer vision and brain computer interface for faster mine detection 5/4/15
Computer scientists combine computer vision and brain computer interface for faster mine detection
Computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, have combined sophisticated computer vision algorithms and a brain-computer interface to find mines in sonar images of the ocean floor. The study shows that the new method speeds detection up considerably, when compared to existing methods—mainly visual inspection by a mine detection expert. 
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UC San Diego Alum Finds Dream Job, Engineering Students Learn How to Discover Theirs 5/1/15
UC San Diego Alum Finds Dream Job, Engineering Students Learn How to Discover Theirs
 “Every week, I get to teach kids how to build stuff that I think is really cool, and then watch what they create from it,” said Naderi. “I have my dream job.” The path to her dream job wasn’t a straight one, and Naderi recently returned to the Jacobs School of Engineering to impart her wisdom to undergraduate engineering students.
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Lighting a Spark for Computer Programming 4/30/15
Lighting a Spark for Computer Programming
Second- to fifth-grade students at Adams Elementary School in the City Heights neighborhood of San Diego are learning how to program while playing a simulated version of Minecraft, a popular computer game. The programming classes are made possible by a partnership between the San Diego Rotary Club, San Diego schools and ThoughtSTEM, a company co-founded by three Ph.D. students at UC San Diego. In addition to Adams, two other elementary schools and two middle schools in City Heights are taking part in the program.
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UC San Diego Technology Transfer Celebrates 20 Years of Innovation and Impact 4/30/15
UC San Diego Technology Transfer Celebrates 20 Years of Innovation and Impact
The 20th anniversary of the UC San Diego Technology Transfer Office (TTO) drew a standing-room-only crowd that included distinguished faculty innovators and young alumni entrepreneurs. Hosted by Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla, the event featured a keynote address by Qualcomm Founder Irwin M. Jacobs and congratulations from San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer, who proclaimed April 14, 2015 as “UC San Diego Innovation and Impact Day.”
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4/24/15
Jacobs School of Engineering Students Receive 2015 NSF Graduate Research Fellowships
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded Graduate Research Fellowships to seven students from the Jacobs School of Engineering. This year, the NSF received approximately 16,500 applications and made 2,000 fellowship award offers. The fellowships provide three years of financial support – including an annual stipend and a cost-of-education allowance to the graduate institution – during a five-year period to individuals pursuing research-based master’s or doctoral degrees in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics.
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Engineering the smallest crack in the world 4/23/15
Engineering the smallest crack in the world
A new procedure will enable researchers to fabricate smaller, faster, and more powerful nanoscale devices ─ and do so with molecular control and precision. Using a single layer of carbon atoms, or graphene, nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have invented a new way of fabricating nanostructures that contain well-defined, atomic-sized gaps. The results from the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering were published in the January issue of the journal Nano Letters. Structures with these well-defined, atomic-sized gaps could be used to detect single molecules associated with certain diseases and might one day lead to microprocessors that are 100 times smaller than the ones in today’s computers.
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'Holey' graphene for energy storage 4/21/15
'Holey' graphene for energy storage
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have discovered a method to increase the amount of electric charge that can be stored in graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon. The research, published recently online in the journal Nano Letters, may provide a better understanding of how to improve the energy storage ability of capacitors for potential applications in cars, wind turbines, and solar power.
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Breast Tumor Stiffness and Metastasis Risk Linked by Molecule's Movement 4/20/15
Breast Tumor Stiffness and Metastasis Risk Linked by Molecule's Movement
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center have discovered a molecular mechanism that connects breast tissue stiffness to tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. The study, published April 20 inNature Cell Biology, may inspire new approaches to predicting patient outcomes and halting tumor metastasis.“We’re finding that cancer cell behavior isn’t driven by just biochemical signals, but also biomechanical signals from the tumor’s physical environment,” said senior author Jing Yang, PhD, associate professor of pharmacology and pediatrics.
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