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11.25.08 Information Week
"New Malware Technique Bypasses Traditional Defenses"
Two University of California, San Diego computer science graduate students -- Erik Buchanan and Ryan Roemer -- have demonstrated a way to turn good computer code into malicious instructions using a technique called "return-oriented programming."... Related Jacobs School Link »

11.25.08 Dark Reading
" Hack Turns Application Code Against Itself"
Researchers from the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) have devised a technique that basically lets an attacker bypass built-in system defenses aimed at blocking malware, and then execute instructions from inside the application. The process uses an application's vulnerability to turn it against the system on which it runs. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.25.08 Programmazione.it
"Return-oriented Programming, una nuova minaccia per la sicurezza"
Il metodo richiedeva per una faticosa codifica manuale; ora Erik Buchanan e Ryan Roemer entrambi graduate student alla UC San Diego hanno automatizzato la procedura e l'hanno estesa alle macchine con architettura RISC. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.25.08 Technology Review
"A Fast, Programmable Molecular Clock"
A molecular timepiece that ticks away the time with a flash of fluorescent protein could provide the basis for novel biosensors. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.25.08 Discover Magazine
"The Clock That Breeds"
Thats why its so impressive that scientists at the University of California at San Diego have just made the movie Ive embedded below: glowing bacteria keep time with their blinks. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.25.08 NBC San Diego 7/39
"Spying on Your Keys"
Computer scientists at UCSD have built a program that duplicates keys using pictures taken from hundreds of feet away without the owner even noticing. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.25.08 MSNBC
"How a camera can steal your keys"
Hide those keys. A quick camera phone picture could unlock your doors. Scientists in California have developed a software algorithm that automatically creates a physical key based solely on a picture of one, regardless of angle or distance. The project, called Sneakey, was meant to warn people about the dangers of haphazardly placing keys in the open or posting images of them online. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.25.08 Discovery Channel Online
"'Stealing' Keys by Camera Proven Easy"
Hide those keys. A quick camera phone picture could unlock your doors. Scientists in California have developed a software algorithm that automatically creates a physical key based solely on a picture of one, regardless of angle or distance. The project, called Sneakey, was meant to warn people about the dangers of haphazardly placing keys in the open or posting images of them online. Related Jacobs School Link »

10.20.08 Los Angeles Times
"Microsoft strategist Craig Mundie looks to future"
Microsoft strategist Craig Mundie looks to future during QA at UCSD with Los Angeles Times journalist. Related Jacobs School Link »

10.20.08 Genetic Engineering News
"Put the protein pieces together with algorithms: Solving 'the mass spec data mess'"
UC San Diego engineers and scientists have received a five-year $4.94M grant from the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), a part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to develop algorithms and software for deciphering all the proteins that are present in biological samples. Related Jacobs School Link »

10.20.08 San Diego Union Tribune
"UCSD-LED national team is researching role that lipids play in diseases"
Work by a national team of researchers led by scientists at UCSD, including the chair of the bioengineering department,is shedding new light on the active role that these molecules, known as lipids, play in diabetes, stroke, cancer, arthritis, Alzheimer's disease and many other ailments. Related Jacobs School Link »

10.20.08 4Engr.com
"UC San Diego Researchers Create Enhanced Light Sources For Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography"
A breakthrough discovery at University of California - San Diego may help aid the semiconductor industrys quest to squeeze more information on chips to accelerate the performance of electronic devices. So far, the semiconductor industry has been successful in its consistent efforts to reduce feature size on a chip. Smaller features mean denser packing of transistors, which leads to more powerful computers, more memory, and hopefully lower costs. Related Jacobs School Link »

10.12.08 North County Times
"Snails Crawling on water—upside down"
During billions of years of evolution, living creatures have adopted numerous means of locomotion. UC San Diego engineer Eric Lauga has recently explained one of the strangest: that of a snail that moves on the water's surface, upside down, on ripples of slime. Related Jacobs School Link »

9.26.08 New Scientist
"Invention: Universal Detector"
Kevin Tetz a Jacobs School alumnus in electrical engineeringand colleagues in the Ultrafast and Nanoscale Optics Group at the University of California, San Diego, have designed a system to exploit that to test for any surface contamination on the surface of, well, anything. Related Jacobs School Link »

9.26.08 San Diego Channel 6 TV
"Android vs. i Phone"
San Diego Channel 6 came to the Jacobs Schoolon Tuesday Sept 23 to find out what our tech-savvy student body thought about the new Google phones unveiled in New York. Related Jacobs School Link »

9.15.08 Popular Science
" Origami Optics"
In 2003, a program funded by the Pentagons Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa) known as MONTAGE asked universities to find ways to squeeze unprecedented levels of magnification and resolution from small, super-thin lensestechnology that could be used in future imaging devices for finding, tracking, and identifying military targets. With some advice from his adviser Joseph Ford, UCSD graduate student Eric Tremblay decided to use an old idea... Related Jacobs School Link »

9.9.08 San Diego Daily Transcript
"ViaSat interns present projects, earn employment"
Jacobs School of Engineering students hired by ViaSat for the summer presented their work at an event covered by San Diego Daily Transcript reporter Erin Bridges. Theres no possible way we could get this experience in academic environments, said Stephan Kemper, an undergraduate student at the University of California, San Diego, during his presentation. He and his teammates were exposed to more of the business side of engineering -- working with vendors and facing the h...

9.8.08 Engadget
"Coaster-sized origami-optics lens boosts focal length, shrinks photog egos"
Sports photogs aren't compensating for something by swinging gigantic, monopod-mounted lenses; they need the focal length. Focusing and zooming on outfielders usually means glass far from the camera body, but not so when using so-called "origami optics," flat lenses being researched at UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering that use internal reflection to achieve long focal lengths. Related Jacobs School Link »

9.8.08 San Diego Channel 6 TV
"Online Books"
A back-to-school segment about online and digital textbooks. MAE professor Tom Bewley is interviewed about his online text book. You can access the book online for free and pay a small fee to print out individual chapters.

9.8.08 La Jolla Light
"Stem cell center moving ahead"
Plans to build a center that would bring together the area's top stem cell researchers in one facility on land across from UCSD are entering another phase with the release of a draft report on the project. Proponents say a new state-of-the-art facility is needed to bring the best scientific minds on Torrey Pines Mesa together and create an environment in which they can thrive.

9.8.08 Voice of San Diego
"Analyze This"
This overview story about San Diego as a hub for analytics mentions the important contributions of UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering to this growing area.

9.8.08 Engineering TV
"Origami Optics"
Most camera lenses refract light, leading to the familiar cylindrical tube geometry. In some cases, where extended focal length or reduced track length are required, concentric mirrors can be used to effectively reduce barrel length. Recent advances in diamond machining and image processing make it possible to take this approach to a new extreme. With up to 8 reflections, large ray angles, and a lens shaped more like a lens cap than a tube, so-called Origami Optics allowed researchers a... Related Jacobs School Link »

9.8.08 Science Today
"Nationwide effort to make buildings earthquake safe"
Engineering researchers from UC San Diego and the University of Arizona have concluded three months of rigorous earthquake simulation tests on a half-scale three-story structure, and will now begin sifting through their results so they can be used in the future designs of buildings across the nation... Related Jacobs School Link »

9.5.08 Popular Science
" Making a Hopping Robot"
What started as an academic problem in a robotics classhow to build a robot that can hop like a pogo stick, roll on wheels, and walk up stairshas grown into a concept that could one day help with search-and-rescue missions. UCSD grad students Christopher Schmidt-Wetekam and David Zhang solved the problem with three innovations. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.29.08 NetworkWorld
"New router algorithm offers hope for old routers"
A team of computer scientists from UC San Diegohas proposed a new algorithm that makes routers operate more efficiently by automatically limiting the number of network route or link-state updates they receive. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.29.08 California Science & Technology News
"Giving Hair “The Matrix Treatment”"
Imagine avatars of your favorite actors wandering through 3D virtual worlds with hair that looks almost exactly like it does in real life. This level of realism for animated hairstyles is one step closer to the silver screen, thanks to new research being presented at SIGGRAPH, one of the most competitive computer graphics conferences in the world. The breakthrough is a collaboration between researchers at UC San Diego, Adobe Systems Incorporated (Nasdaq: ADBE) and the Massachusetts Inst... Related Jacobs School Link »

8.29.08 Storagemojo (Tech Blog)
"Fat trees and skinny switches"
In their paper, A Scalable, Commodity Data Center Network Architecture, (pdf) Mohammad Al-Fares, Alexander Loukissas and Amin Vahdat, 3 UC San Diego computer scientists, present an architecture that may do just that. They propose to leverage commodity Ethernet switches to support the full aggregate bandwidth of clusters. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.28.08 Slashdot
" New Algorithm Boosts Network Efficiency"
Jacobs School computer scientists recentlypresented this work at ACM SIGCOMM, and now it has landed on the venerable Slashdot site. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.26.08 PC World
"Could 'fat-tree' switch setup trim data center costs?"
Buying faster switches might not be the only way to amp up performance across data center networks, according to researchers at the University of California, San Diego, who this week proposed a network architecture that would enable commodity Ethernet switches to deliver better performance at a lower cost than their 10 Gigabit Ethernet counterparts. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.24.08 NetworkWorld (print and online)
"Could 'fat-tree' switch setup be key to trimming data center costs?"
Buying faster switches might not be the only way to amp up performance across data center networks, according to researchers at the University of California, San Diego, who this week proposed a network architecture that would enable commodity Ethernet switches to deliver better performance at a lower cost than their 10 Gigabit Ethernet counterparts. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.24.08 NBC San Diego
"Local School Ranked Among Best In Nation"
The publications annual America's Best Colleges was released Thursday by the publication and lists UCSD at No. 7 among the top public universities in the nation. UCSD is tied at seventh with the Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The local school was also recognized in the list of Up and Coming Schools as 14th among national universities, and the UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering was No. 17 in the engineering-school category. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.24.08 Science Daily
"Rigorous Earthquake Simulations Aim To Make Buildings Safer"
Engineering researchers from UC San Diego and the University of Arizona have concluded three months of rigorous earthquake simulation tests on a half-scale three-story structure, and will now begin sifting through their results so they can be used in the future designs of buildings across the nation. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.24.08 Bloomberg News
"T. Rex-Chicken Controversy Roils Protein Scientists"
Pavel A. Pevzner,* Sangtae Kim, Julio Ng published a technical comment in response to the paper "Protein Sequences from Mastodon and Tyrannosaurus rex Revealed by Mass Spectrometry." The technical comment appeared in the 21 August 2008 issue of the journal Science. Pevzner Abstract: Asara et al. (Reports, 13 April 2007, p. 280) reported sequencing of Tyrannosaurus rex proteins and used them to establish the evolutionary relationships between birds and dinosaurs. We argue that the repo... Related Jacobs School Link »

8.24.08 Nature
"Fresh doubts over T. rex chicken link"
Pavel A. Pevzner,* Sangtae Kim, Julio Ng published a technical comment in response to the paper "Protein Sequences from Mastodon and Tyrannosaurus rex Revealed by Mass Spectrometry." The technical comment appeared in the 21 August 2008 issue of the journal Science. Pevzner Abstract: Asara et al. (Reports, 13 April 2007, p. 280) reported sequencing of Tyrannosaurus rex proteins and used them to establish the evolutionary relationships between birds and dinosaurs. We argue that the repo... Related Jacobs School Link »

8.24.08 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Bulletin
"Thinking Like an Engineer"
Bioengineering professor Robert Sah is profiled in the cover story of the latest HHMI magazine.

8.24.08 Discover Magazine
"Scientists Create Flowing Locks for Cartoons"
As the paparazzi wait for celebrities to walk by with perfect hair, researchers have found a way to create perfect hair graphically. Scientists at the University of California at San Diego used cameras and light sources in a new way to create ultra-realistic hair on animated figures. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.24.08 North County Times
"Telemedicine boosted by stroke study"
Stroke patients can be diagnosed with dramatically greater effectiveness by a program that connects them to doctors through the Internet, according to a UCSD Medical Center study. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.24.08 San Diego Business Journal
"Grad Student Develops Software To Keep Track of Stolen Laptops"
A graduate student at UC San Diego helped develop free software that tracks stolen or lost laptop computers. Called Adeona, the software tracks personal information such as the computers identification, called Internet Protocol Address, which network its using, and on newer Macintoshes with built-in cameras, Adeona even takes pictures of those using the laptop.

8.24.08 Science Daily
"Rigorous Earthquake Simulations Aim to make Buildings Safer"
Engineering researchers from UC San Diego and the University of Arizona have concluded three months of rigorous earthquake simulation tests on a half-scale three-story structure, and will now begin sifting through their results so they can be used in the future designs of buildings across the nation. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.18.08 ZDNet
"Hairstyles for games and movies"
U.S researchers have announced at the SIGGRAPH 2008 conference that they have developed a new method for accurately capturing the look of a persons hairstyle for use in animated films and video games. The research team used multiple cameras, light sources and projectors. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.18.08 PhysOrg.com
"Hollywood Hair is Captured at Last"
Imagine avatars of your favorite actors wandering through 3D virtual worlds with hair that looks almost exactly like it does in real life. Now imagine this hair blowing in the wind and shining in the sun. This level of realism for animated hairstyles is one step closer to the silver screen, thanks to new research being presented at ACM SIGGRAPH, one of the most competitive computer graphics conferences in the world. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.18.08 IndiaTimes
"Game images to go slicker"
WASHINGTON: Most of the images that serve as computer screen or 3D video games background are often hand painted and expensive. But a breakthrough by a University of California graduate offers game developers the possibility of high quality yet lightweight images, free of stretch marks, flickering and other problems. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.18.08 Red Orbit
"3D Video Games Get Better With New Advances"
The images of rocks, clouds, marble and other textures that serve as background images and details for 3D video games are often hand painted and thus costly to generate. A breakthrough from a UC San Diego computer science undergraduate now offers video game developers the possibility of high quality yet lightweight images for 3D video games that are generated on the fly and are free of stretch marks, flickering and other artifacts. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.18.08 Dr. Dobb's Portal
"Rendering High-Quality Images On-the-Fly"
The images of rocks, clouds, marble and other textures that serve as background images and details for 3D video games are often hand painted and thus costly to generate. A technique by game programmer Alex Goldberg now offers video game developers the possibility of high-quality, yet lightweight, images for 3D video games that are generated on-the-fly and are free of stretch marks, flickering, and other artifacts. "It should be pretty easy for video game developers to integrate our r... Related Jacobs School Link »

8.18.08 PhysOrg.com
"Images for 3D Video Games Without High Price Tags or Stretch Marks"
The images of rocks, clouds, marble and other textures that serve as background images and details for 3D video games are often hand painted and thus costly to generate. A breakthrough from a UC San Diego computer science undergraduate now offers video game developers the possibility of high quality yet lightweight images for 3D video games that are generated "on the fly" and are free of stretch marks, flickering and other artifacts. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.18.08 Science Daily
"Images For 3-D Video Games Without High Price Tags Or Stretch Marks From UC San Diego"
A breakthrough from a UC San Diego computer science undergraduate now offers video game developers the possibility of high quality yet lightweight images for 3D video games that are generated on the fly and are free of stretch marks, flickering and other artifacts. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.18.08 L'Atelier (French technology magazine)
"Même les avatars ont leur coiffeur"
L'UC San Diego dveloppe un systme capable de reproduire de manire trs raliste une chevelure pour personnages virtuels. En partant d'images relles, son algorithme gnre des modles capillaires, au cheveu prs. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.18.08 San Diego Union Tribune
"State agency allots $13 million for local stem cell researchers"
Six San Diego scientists will receive more than $15 million in funding from the state stem cell institute, to support projects ranging from the development of a therapy to halt acute leukemias to research into therapies to prevent premature birth and birth defects. Shyni Varghese, an assistant professor in the Department of Bioengineering in the UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering, who will receive $2.3 million. Varghese will explore embryonic stem cell-based transplantation the... Related Jacobs School Link »

8.18.08 San Diego Business Journal
"http://www.sdbj.com/industry_article.asp?aID=32226377.4287478.1668953.8662645.5736731.829&aID2=12837"
A graduate student at UC San Diego helped develop free software that tracks stolen or lost laptop computers. Called Adeona, the software tracks personal information such as the computers identification, called Internet Protocol Address, which network its using, and on newer Macintoshes with built-in cameras, Adeona even takes pictures of those using the laptop.

8.14.08 Chronicle of Higher Education
"UCSD Undergrad Designs Cheap High-Quality Images for 3-D Video Games"
An alumnus of the University of California, San Diegos Jacobs School of Engineering presented yesterday a technique to create on the fly cheap, lightweight and undistorted background images for 3-D video games that he designed while he was still a computer science undergraduate student. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.14.08 News 8 San Diego
"New Website Helps Women Find A Fresh New Look"
A new website can give you a new look. It's fast, free and women all over the world are trying out the latest fashions on their faces. You say you want to change your hairstyle and makeup, but your afraid of making a major mistake? Taaz.com (a Jacobs School startup)might just be the answer. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.2.08 San Francisco Chronicle
"One Way To Keep Track Of Your Lost Laptop"
Two computer science students--Thomas Ristenpart at the University of California, San Diego, and Gabriel Maganis at the University of Washington in Seattle--have developed free software to track lost or stolen laptops.

8.2.08 Voice of San Diego
"Robot Teachers"
A recorded physics lecture plays on a computer screen as Jacob Whitehill's face erupts into a wide grin. Immediately, the onscreen professor who is scribbling formulas on a whiteboard springs into high speed, his voice squeaky and high-pitched as if Whitehill had pressed fast forward on a remote control. As the smile subsides and Whitehill's face relaxes, the bearded professor simultaneously slows, and his movements and speech return to a normal pace and pitch as if Whitehill had presse... Related Jacobs School Link »

8.2.08 Baltimore Sun
"On teaching and reading faces"
The science behind reading faces isfascinating. Sometimes it'sobviouswhen someone is confused, happy, sad, angry, distracted etc. and other timeswhat you can seein someone'sface issubtle andhard to read. Distilling facialexpressions into mathematical formulas that can be put into a computer program,withthe panoply ofhuman emotions we allexperience and observe in others,must be really... Related Jacobs School Link »

7.14.08 North County Times
"Discovery could lower cost of semiconductor chips"
A new manufacturing method can bring down the cost of the next generation of semiconductor chips, says a UC San Diego researcher whose team developed the technology. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.14.08 North County Times
"Discovery could lower cost of semiconductor chips"
A new manufacturing method can bring down the cost of the next generation of semiconductor chips, says a UC San Diego researcher whose team developed the technology. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.9.08 North County Times
"Discovery Could Lead lower cost of semiconductor chips:"
A new manufacturing method can bring down the cost of the next generation of semiconductor chips, says a UC San Diego researcher whose team developed the technology. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.7.08 ABC.com
"A Computer That Can Read Your Mind"
At the University of California at San Diego, for example, a graduate student has developed a program that will slow down or speed up a video based entirely on changes in his facial expressions, like a slight frown, or a smile. The purpose of this particular program is to make robotic instructors more responsive to their student's needs, but there are many other potential applications for the work. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.3.08 The Daily Texan
"Scientists developing robotic teaching tools"
Robotic teachers may become increasingly prevalent in classrooms and online. The Machine Perception Laboratory at the University of California-San Diego, which builds computers called Intelligent Tutoring Systems, has developed technology that may revolutionize the way students and teachers interact - whether the teacher is a human or a machine. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.3.08 Medical News Today
"UC San Diego Undergraduates Forge New Area Of Bioinformatics"
A group of undergraduate students from the University of California San Diego have forged a new area of bioinformatics that may improve genomic and proteomic annotations and unlock a collection of stubborn biological mysteries. Their work will be published in the July issue of the journal Genome Research. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.3.08 Gizmodo
"Robots That Can Read Your Facial Expression On The Way"
If robots are ever going to get to the point where they can interact with people, they're going to have to figure out how to read someone's face. If a robot can't decode my expression, it totally won't pick up on my biting sarcasm and will take everything I say at face value, and I don't think I need to tell you what kind of hilarious misunderstandings can spring from that. Jacob Whitehill, a computer science Ph.D. student from UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering, has created a... Related Jacobs School Link »

7.1.08 PharmainInfo.net
"A Single Mechanism for Hypertension, Insulin Resistance and Immune Suppression Found in University o"
Many of the 75 million Americans with essential hypertension also develop diabetes and other complications in addition to their high blood pressure, and researchers have discovered a common molecular mechanism in a strain of rat that explains why such metabolic disorders arise together in mammals. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.1.08 Ivanhoe TV - Discoveries and Breakthroughs Inside Science
"Using the Weather to Go Green"
SAN DIEGO, Calif. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- If you're looking for ways to bring your energy costs down you may want to take a look outside. The weather can save you big money if you learn how to work with it. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.1.08 Ivanhoe Broadcasting
"Using the Weather to Go Green"
If professor Jan Kliessl is right this little computer will shave ten percent off University of California, San Diego's energy bill. From athletic fields to utility poles to a rooftop robot -- Kleissl's engineering students track climate conditions across campus. The cool coastal conditions on one side and hot inland conditions on the other side of campus make UCSD an ideal lab for using weather to cut energy costs. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.30.08 Physorg.com
"A single mechanism for hypertension, insulin resistance and immune suppression"
Many of the 75 million Americans with essential hypertension also develop diabetes and other complications in addition to their high blood pressure, and researchers have discovered a common molecular mechanism. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.30.08 Daily India
"Single mechanism underlying hypertension, insulin resistance, immune suppression identified"
The study conducted by bioengineering experts at UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering has also revealed that a drug may effectively counteract the underlying molecular mechanism. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.30.08 Bio-Medicine
"A single mechanism for hypertension, insulin resistance and immune suppression"
In a paper published June 30 in the online version of Hypertension, Frank DeLano, a research scientist at UC San Diego, and Geert Schmid-Schnbein, a professor of bioengineering, describe how they successfully reversed the SHR animals symptoms of high blood pressure, a pre-diabetes condition called insulin resistance, and immune suppression. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.30.08 ScienceCodex
"A single mechanism for hypertension, insulin resistance and immune suppression"
The SHR strain is a model for essential hypertension in humans because both the rodent and many humans with hypertension also develop a variety of other metabolic complications when high blood pressure strikes. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.30.08 SmasHits
"Single mechanism underlying hypertension, insulin resistance, immune suppression identified"
A study on rats has led to the discovery of a mechanism that may help scientists understand why metabolic disorders like hypertension, insulin resistance, and immune suppression arise together in mammals. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.30.08 Biocompare
"A Single Mechanism for Hypertension, Insulin Resistance and Immune Suppression"
Researchers identify the underlying molecular mechanism for hypertension, insulin resistance and other metabolic complications. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.30.08 Yahoo News
"Molecular mechanism behind metabolic disorders identified"
University of California researchers showed that a drug developed for humans was effective in counteracting molecular mechanism in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), a strain predisposed to develop high BP. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.30.08 US News & World Report
"New Molecular Trigger Described for Hypertension, Diabetes"
A newly discovered molecular malfunction may explain the development of high blood pressure, diabetes and immune problems, researchers report.Rogue versions of enzymes known as proteases roam the body, clipping off working segments of the receptors that allow insulin to enter cells and do its job, according to a report in the June 30 online issue of Hypertension. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.30.08 HealthDay
"New Molecular Trigger Described for Hypertension, Diabetes"
Out-of-control enzymes do damage in both conditions, study finds. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.30.08 Science Daily
"Single Mechanism For Hypertension, Insulin Resistance And Immune Suppression"
In a paper published June 30 in the online version of Hypertension, Frank DeLano, a research scientist at UC San Diego, and Geert Schmid-Schnbein, a professor of bioengineering, describe how they successfully reversed the SHR animals symptoms of high blood pressure, a pre-diabetes condition called insulin resistance, and immune suppression. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.30.08 News-Medical.Net
"Hypertension, insulin resistance and immune suppression links"
The bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering also showed that a drug developed for unrelated purposes in humans was effective in counteracting the underlying molecular mechanism in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), a strain predisposed to develop high blood pressure. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.30.08 e! Science News
"A single mechanism for hypertension, insulin resistance and immune suppression"
In the circulation of SHR rodents, Schmid-Schnbein and DeLano found significant levels of proteases, which are enzymes that break down proteins. Natural enzyme inhibitors found in normal healthy rats did not lower the level of protease activity in the SHR strain to normal levels. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.30.08 Washington Post
"New Molecular Trigger Described for Hypertension, Diabetes"
A newly discovered molecular malfunction may explain the development of high blood pressure, diabetes and immune problems, researchers report. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.30.08 MedicineNet.com
"New Molecular Trigger Described for Hypertension, Diabetes"
Rogue versions of enzymes known as proteases roam the body, clipping off working segments of the receptors that allow insulin to enter cells and do its job, according to a report in the June 30 online issue of Hypertension. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.27.08 ZDNet
"Using your face for remote control"
A UC San Diego computer scientist has turned his face into a remote control. One of his goals is to use automated facial expression recognition to make robots more effective teachers. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.27.08 Nature
"Gurning is a way of control"
student in America has worked out how to turn his face into a remote control. PhD student Jacob Whitehill, of UC San Diego, used facial recognition technology to monitor the expressions of test subjects watching video lectures. By detecting confusion, he believes, lectures can be slowed or even replayed over difficult sections. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.27.08 NetworkWorld
"Lost the remote? Use your face"
A researcher has discovered a way to use facial expressions to speed and slow video playback. By using a combination of facial expression recognition software and automated tutoring technology Jacob Whitehill, a computer science Ph.D. student from UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering, is leading the project that ultimately is part of a larger venture to use automated facial expression recognition to make robots more effective teachers. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.27.08 Slashdot
"Lost the Remote? Use Your Face"
"A researcher has discovered a way to use facial expressions to speed and slow video playback. By using a combination of facial expression recognition software and automated tutoring technology Jacob Whitehill, a computer science Ph.D. student from UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering, is leading the project that ultimately is part of a larger venture to use automated facial expression recognition to make robots more effective teachers. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.27.08 Live Science.com
"Man's Face Becomes Remote Control Device"
Jacob Whitehill has built an innovative smile detector that can turn his face into a remote control device that can send simple commands to a computer. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.27.08 Discover Magazine
"Coming Soon: The Robot Teacher That Reads Your Face"
If facial recognition software that can compare your features to a criminal database, or gather data for advertisers, wasnt futuristic enough for you, consider this: Someday when youre taking a class from a robot instructor, it might be able to tell how well you understand the material solely based on your facial expressions. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.27.08 CrunchGear
"Facial expression recognition for robotic teachers"
Jacob Whitehill of UC San Diegos computer science Ph. D program has developed software that recognizes common facial expressions and then translates those expressions into commands that either speed up or slow down the playback of certain video lectures. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.27.08 Engadget
"Expression recognition turns humans into remote controls... for robots"
Jacob Whitehill at UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering has demonstrated a proof of concept that allows his facial expressions to speed-up and slow-down video playback. Pretty sweet. But we're more interested to hear that his project is part of a larger effort at the UCSD Machine Perception Lab (gulp) to use automated face recognition to "make robots more effective teachers." We can see the future now... Related Jacobs School Link »

6.27.08 Earth & Sky
"Face Control"
I hate it when I cant find my TV remote. Once I even managed to leave it in the refrigerator (dont ask) and couldnt find it for three days. But the days of TV remote losing may soon be over, if a UC San Diego computer science grad student named Jacob Whitehill has his way. Hes invented a system that allows him to control video playback with his face. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.27.08 Los Angeles Times Technology Blog
"Around the Web 6.28.08"
So might the remote control. Use your face instead. NetworkWorld... Related Jacobs School Link »

6.27.08 Chronicle of Higher Education
"Facial-Recognition Software Could Give Valuable Feedback to Online Professors"
Many professors who teach online complain that they have no way of seeing whether their far-away students are following the lectures or whether the students have fallen asleep at their desks. But researchers at the University of California at San Diego say they have a solution. They recently tested a system that can detect facial expressions of online students and determine when they find the material difficult, so that cues could be sent to the professors telling them to slow... Related Jacobs School Link »

6.9.08 History Channel
"Modern Marvels: Super Hot"
Explore the world of extreme temperatures. See what happens to Pyroman, a life-size mannequin, as he is exposed to over 3,000 degreesF. Visit Underwriters Laboratories and see how common household appliances can go lethal. Follow geologists as they take lava samples from the Kilauea volcano in Hawaii. Finally, journey into a fusion facility in San Diego, California and watch as scientist's heat plasma to over 200 million degreesF in hopes of someday creating an inexhaustible power...

6.9.08 National Geographic
"Lunar Concrete May Form Buildings on the Moon"
Yu Qiao is a materials scientist at the University of California, San Diego, who has also worked on lunar infrastructure materials but was not involved in Chen's study. He called the new technique "very promising" but said the material will have to pass long-term durability tests. "Many epoxies may be fragile after a few years of exposure to radiation, and radiation at the lunar surface is very intense," he said. Qiao also noted that some materials more lightweight than epoxy might also...

6.6.08 LinuxInsider.com
"Bhaskar Rao: Conquering Space and Time With MIMO"
Bhaskar Rao is a space explorer. His expertise, however, lies in MIMO space, not outer space. Work in multiple input multiple output technologies has opened a new door for wireless communications based on space as well as frequency. "Space is the new dimension in communication," Rao said. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.6.08 CRM Buyer
"Bhaskar Rao: Conquering Space and Time With MIMO"
Bhaskar Rao is known for his discoveries in the realm of space exploration. However, he's never ventured beyond the atmosphere of Mother Earth. His space-related technology expertise lies in innovative advances in the world of signal processing. His explorations resulted in the emergence of MIMO, or multiple input multiple output. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.6.08 E-Commerce Times
"Bhaskar Rao: Conquering Space and Time With MIMO"
An electrical engineer from the University of California at San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering, Rao's discoveries are contributing to advances in wireless communications networks. His work will help to develop ways for high-quality video and other high-data-rate content to flow across wireless channels without increased power consumption or bandwidth usage. So far, this technology is only effective in areas where wireless channel conditions are suitable. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.6.08 TechNewsWorld
"Bhaskar Rao: Conquering Space and Time With MIMO"
Bhaskar Rao'swork in electrical engineering is reflected in more than 200 journal and conference publications involving signal processing, estimation theory, speech coding, multiple-antenna transmission and space-time coding. One of his latest accomplishments was sharing the 2008 Stephen O. Rice Prize Paper Award in the field of communications systems. This award was given jointly to Rao, fellow electrical engineering professor Rene Cruz and Cruz's doctoral student, Bongyong Song. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.16.08 PhysOrg.com
"Space is 'current frontier' for engineer working on next-gen wireless technologies"
Bhaskar Rao is a space explorer, though he is no astronaut. The electrical engineer from UC San Diegos Jacobs School of Engineering explores the space frontier that has opened up with the emergence of MIMO (multiple input multiple output) technologies for wireless communications. In MIMO systems, both transmitters and receivers contain multiple antennae, which means that space and not just time is in play when it comes to signal processing strategies for i... Related Jacobs School Link »

5.16.08 EDN Electronics Design, Strategy, News
"University working to create nanostructures to raise thin-film solar cell efficiency"
Professor Edward Yu, the principal investigator on the grant explained that the most recent estimate of the maximum power conversion efficiency under normal illumination conditions that one can expect with this approach is approximately 45%, which is a very large improvement over the 31% maximum theoretical efficiency for today's solar cells with classic p-n junctions. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.16.08 AZO Optics
"New Devices Could Lead to Big Gains in Thin-Film Solar Cell Efficiency"
Thanks to nanostructures that scatter and channel light, University of California, San Diego electrical engineers are working toward thin-film "single junction" solar cells with the potential for nearly 45 percent sunlight-to-electricity conversion efficiencies. This effort to break the theoretical limit of 31 percent efficiency for conventional single junction cells recently received a big funding boost from the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar America program. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.16.08 AZoNano.com
"Nanostructures Raise Thin Film Solar Cell Efficiency"
Thanks to nanostructures that scatter and channel light, University of California, San Diego electrical engineers are working toward thin-film single junction solar cells with the potential for nearly 45 percent sunlight-to-electricity conversion efficiencies. This UC San Diego effort to break the theoretical limit of 31 percent efficiency for conventional single junction cells recently received a big funding boost from the U.S. Department of Energys Solar America program... Related Jacobs School Link »

5.16.08 Science Daily
"Nanostructures Will Raise Thin-Film Solar Cell Efficiency"
Thanks to nanostructures that scatter and channel light, University of California, San Diego electrical engineers are working toward thin-film single junction solar cells with the potential for nearly 45 percent sunlight-to-electricity conversion efficiencies. This effort to break the theoretical limit of 31 percent efficiency for conventional single junction cells recently received a big funding boost from the U.S. Department of Energys Solar America program. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.16.08 Imperial Valley News
"Nanowires May Boost Solar Cell Efficiency"
San Diego, California - University of California, San Diego electrical engineers have created experimental solar cells spiked with nanowires that could lead to highly efficient thin-film solar cells of the future. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.16.08 Nanowerk
"New nanostructures will raise thin-film solar cell efficiency"
Thanks to nanostructures that scatter and channel light, University of California, San Diego electrical engineers are working toward thin-film single junction solar cells with the potential for nearly 45 percent sunlight-to-electricity conversion efficiencies. This Jacobs School effort to break the theoretical limit of 31 percent efficiency for conventional single junction cells recently received a big funding boost from the U.S. Department of Energys Solar America progra... Related Jacobs School Link »

5.16.08 PhysOrg.com
"UCSD nanostructures will raise thin-film solar cell efficiency"
Thanks to nanostructures that scatter and channel light, University of California, San Diego electrical engineers are working toward thin-film single junction solar cells with the potential for nearly 45 percent sunlight-to-electricity conversion efficiencies. This UC San Diego effort to break the theoretical limit of 31 percent efficiency for conventional single junction cells recently received a big funding boost from the U.S. Department of Energys Solar America p... Related Jacobs School Link »

5.16.08 EurActiv.com
"Nanotech to make solar panels more efficient"
Engineers at the University of California, San Diegohave demonstrated thatnanoparticlescan increase the efficiency with which sunlight can be converted into electricity in thin-film photovoltaics, opening new prospects for solar electricity. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.16.08 Nano Tech Wire
"Nanostructures Will Raise Thin-Film Solar Cell Efficiency"
Thanks to nanostructures that scatter and channel light, University of California, San Diego electrical engineers are working toward thin-film single junction solar cells with the potential for nearly 45 percent sunlight-to-electricity conversion efficiencies. This Jacobs School effort to break the theoretical limit of 31 percent efficiency for conventional single junction cells recently received a big funding boost from the U.S. Department of Energys Solar America... Related Jacobs School Link »

5.16.08 Environmental Expert
"Nanowires May Boost Solar Cell Efficiency, UC San Diego Researchers Say"
University of California, San Diego electrical engineers have created experimental solar cells spiked with nanowires that could lead to highly efficient thin-film solar cells of the future. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.16.08 San Diego Daily Transcript
"Researchers shake it up in the name of building safety, durability"
In early May engineering researchers at the Englekirk Structural Engineering Center, near Scripps Ranch, began subjecting a three-story, precast concrete structure to a sequence of shake tests equivalent in magnitude to ground motions measured during notable national earthquakes. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.8.08 Los Angeles Times
"UCSD quake simulation tests strength of precast concrete"
Groaning and trembling slightly, a three-floor, 400-ton concrete structure was playing its part Wednesday in an earthquake simulation project meant to help prepare California for the Big One. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.8.08 Los Angeles Times
"UCSD quake simulation tests strength of precast concrete"
Researchers in San Diego believe advances in the materials composition could help structures withstand powerful tremors. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.6.08 BioArray News
"Illumina-Genpathway ChIP-Seq Partnership Raises Questions About Future of ChIP-Chip"
Bioengineering professor Trey Ideker comments onconversion catalysts.

5.5.08 MSNBC
"Moving closer to a 'Matrix'-style virtual world"
What if a computer could make you a picture-perfect glass of milk, let you feel the tension as it pulled an ants leg from another room, and chat you up with the charisma of Oprah Winfrey? No one machine can do all three yet. But some sophisticated new projects are showing just how far weve come toward creating an I cant believe its not real virtual world. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.5.08 UCOP Science Today
"Treatment for Severe Blood Loss: Less is More"
Intravenous administration of isotonic fluids is the standard emergency treatment in the U.S. for patients with severe blood loss, but UC San Diego bioengineering researchers have reported improved resuscitation with a radically different approach. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.29.08 US News & World Report
"Viscosity Enhancers Curb Bleeding Complications"
Currently, intravenous administration of isotonic fluids is the standard emergency treatment for patients with severe bleeding. Previous research has shown that intravenous fluids eight times saltier than normal saline may be beneficial. Building on that research, the UCSD team combined hypertonic saline with viscosity enhancers that thicken blood. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.29.08 Atlanta Journal Constitution
"Viscosity Enhancers Curb Bleeding Complications"
UCSD researchers found this approach resulted in dramatic increases in beneficial blood flow in the small blood vessels of hamsters who'd lost as much as half of their blood. The combined hypertonic saline and viscosity enhancement significantly improved the hamsters' functional capillary density, a key measure of healthy blood flow through tissues and organs. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.29.08 News8, (New Haven, Connecticut)
"Viscosity Enhancers Curb Bleeding Complications"
"Of course, trauma physicians want to get the blood flowing as soon as possible, and increasing the viscosity of blood may not make any sense to them," team leader Marcos Intaglietta, a professor of bioengineering, said in a prepared statement. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.29.08 Ivanhoe Newswire
"Thicker Blood Better in Trauma Cases"
Conventional wisdom says thinner blood is the way to go when trying to overcome massive blood loss due to trauma. New research out of the University of California San Diego (UCSD) begs to differ. In a study conducted in hamsters, researchers found much better results from a strategy aimed at thickening up the blood instead. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.29.08 Science Centric
"Hyperviscous fluids: Better treatment for severe blood loss"
Intravenous administration of isotonic fluids is the standard emergency treatment in the U.S. for patients with severe blood loss, but UC San Diego bioengineering researchers have reported improved resuscitation with a radically different approach. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.29.08 MedPage Today
"Thicker Blood Equals Better Recovery from Blood Loss in Animals"
La Jolla, Calif., April 29 -- The effects of traumatic blood loss may be eased, paradoxically, by thickening the plasma that remains, researchers here suggested. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.28.08 Forbes.com
"Viscosity Enhancers Curb Bleeding Complications"
Viscosity enhancers that thicken the blood are highly effective in treating severe bleeding, according to a study by University of California, San Diego, bioengineering researchers. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.27.08 San Diego Union Tribune
"For the young at art: New Children's Museum will let youngsters unleash their inner Picasso"
Architect Rob Wellington Quigley got help from Paul Linden, a professor of engineering at UCSD, when he designed the building. Nearly half of the museum has no mechanical heating or cooling systems; officials estimate that the design will decrease energy consumption by about half. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.25.08 PhysOrg.com
"Creating Faster Integrated Circuits by Slowing Light"
Slowing light, something that college physics textbooks don't even mention, is now increasingly looked upon by scientists as a viable way to enable the transport of information optically rather than with wires, a breakthrough that, in theory, would significantly enhance computer performance and lower the power required by future computer systems. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.21.08 Slashdot
" Coolest University Tech Lab Projects in the Works"
Slashdot recognized the Network World article on "the 25radical network projects you should know about." The bandwidth control in the clouds project from the UCSD computer science depatment is among the 25: "While universities like MIT, Berkeley and CMU don't tend to shout as loudly about their latest tech innovations as do Google, Cisco and other big vendors, their results are no less impressive in what they could mean for faster, more secure and more useful networks, computers, etc. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.18.08 Innovations Report
"Computer Science Fog Machine Improves Computer Graphics"
UC San Diego computer scientists have created a fog and smoke machine for computer graphics that cuts the computational cost of making realistic smoky and foggy 3-D images, such as beams of light from a lighthouse piercing thick fog. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.18.08 Inventor Spot
"Breakthrough Website Taaz.com Offers Makeovers on the Internet!"
If you have ever wondered what you'd look like with a different makeup scheme, a radically different hairstyle or, well, say something a bit more unusual - the creators of Taaz.com can help you. According to its Web site, "Taaz.com is a fun, easy-to-use website that gives women the opportunity to try on the hottest makeup and hairstyle looks from the convenience of their homes. From creating the perfect smoky eye to painting on a dramatic ruby-red lip for a night out on t... Related Jacobs School Link »

4.18.08 PhysOrg.com
"Computer Science Fog Machine Improves Computer Graphics"
By cutting the computing cost for creating highly realistic imagery from scratch, the UCSD computer scientists are helping to pull cutting edge graphics techniques out of research labs and into movies and eventually video games and beyond. The findings are being presented this week at Europes premier computer graphics conference, Eurographics 2008 in Crete, Greece on April 17. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.17.08 NetworkWorld
"25 radical network research projects you should know about"
University of California at San Diego computer scientists say they have developed a TCP-based bandwidth management system that works across global networks. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.17.08 ZDNet
"A new way to improve computer graphics"
Computer scientists at the University of California in San Diego (UCSD) have developed a fog and smoke machine for computer graphics which dramatically cuts computing costs for generating bright images. Theyve used photon mapping algorithms, a subset of the more computationally intensive ray tracing algorithms and with better results. This could lead to better computer graphics for movies and video games. Now, the researchers are adapting their algorithms to rende... Related Jacobs School Link »

4.17.08 United Press International (UPI)
"New computer graphics program is unveiled"
SAN DIEGO, April 17 (UPI) -- U.S. computer scientists Thursday announced creation of a fog and smoke program for computer graphics. The University of California-San Diego researchers said their program cuts the computational cost of making realistic smoky and foggy 3-D images, such as depicting beams of light from a lighthouse piercing thick fog. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.17.08 CCN (California Computer News)
"A Better Fog and Smoke Machine"
UC San Diego computer scientists have created a fog and smoke machine for computer graphics that cuts the computational cost of making realistic smoky and foggy 3-D images, such as beams of light from a lighthouse piercing thick fog. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.17.08 Microsoft
"Scientists Explore Human Gene Pool With Help From Microsoft Research"
Bioengineering professor Trey Ideker and Richard Karp propose to help explain the associations captured by genome wide association studiesin terms of known gene and protein interactions by developing computational tools that help explain linkages between signaling, regulatory and metabolic pathways to the genes that are associated with a disorder. If successful, this research could have a positive impact on a broad range of genomic studies.

4.16.08 TG Daily
"Scientists turn to ray-tracing for advanced graphics effects"
San Diego (CA) It is no secret anymore that lots of people and scientist are looking for new ways to increase the realism of graphics other then pushing the limits of traditional rasterization techniques. Ray-tracing is a term that comes up frequently these days and apparently, there is a lot of potential in tuning already existing algorithms to make them more suitable for general computing platforms: UCSD scientists have discovered a lightweight approach to simulate fog... Related Jacobs School Link »

4.16.08 bizSanDiego
"Q&A with Bob Slapin, executive director of the SDSIC"
We also have an excellent relationship with the Jacobs School of Engineering at UCSD. The Jacobs school is also very committed to the field of software analytics. - Bob Slapin...

4.15.08 Science Daily
"A Better Fog And Smoke Machine From Computer Scientists"
UC San Diego computer scientists have created a fog and smoke machine for computer graphics that cuts the computational cost of making realistic smoky and foggy 3-D images, such as beams of light from a lighthouse piercing thick fog. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.13.08 San Diego Union Tribune
"Web site lets users test out new looks: UCSD team's algorithm is used on facial images"
David Kriegman is a balding, bespectacled 46-year-old professor of computer science at UCSD who does not wear makeup. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.10.08 Embedded.com
"Get credits from UCSD when you attend ESC"
Engineers attending embedded computing conferences from Boston to Bangalore, India to Silicon Valley can earn university continuing education credits through an innovative global partnership between the UC San Diego Extension and TechInsights, owners of Embedded.com and the global Embedded Systems Conference (ESC).

4.8.08 South Florida Sun-Sentinel
"Researchers eliminate drug discovery bottleneck"
Determining the structure of unknown natural compounds is a slow and expensive part of drug screening and development. But this may now change thanks to a new combination of experimental and computational protocols developed at the University of California San Diego and presented at RECOMB 2008 (Research in Computational Molecular Biology) on March 31 in Singapore. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.7.08 San Diego Business Journal
"UCSD Strives to Be ‘Greenest’ University"
Administrators at UC San Diego say the school will soon lead the nations universities in the use of renewable energy sources. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.4.08 San Diego Union Tribune
"UC San Diego going "green""
The University of California San Diego announced Thursday that it's trying to become the "greenest" university in the nation through efforts such as buying power generated by environmentally friendly means, using alternate-fuel vehicles and conducting research projects on global warming and related topics. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.4.08 Environment News Service
"Renewables Boost UC San Diego's Green Credentials"
The University of California-San Diego will soon generate 10 to 15 percent of its annual electrical needs with alternative generating capacity. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.4.08 Chronicle of Higher Education
"U. of California at San Diego Plans Projects in Renewable Energy"
The University of California at San Diego has announced a set of renewable-energy projects that will provide 10 to 15 percent of the universitys power. Solar arrays on the tops of campus buildings and parking structures will provide up to 2 megawatts of electricity. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.4.08 NBC11 San Francisco
"Renewables Boost UC San Diego's Green Credentials"
UC San Diego signed a contract in March to build one megawatt of photovoltaic capacity. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.4.08 10News
"UCSD Announces Plans To Go Green"
The University of California, San Diego is on its way to becoming a leader in green campuses, 10News reported. The university announced it is launching new energy saving practices to become a waste-free campus by 2020. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.4.08 KPBS
"UCSD Aims to Join Top Tier of "Green" Universities"
UC San Diego aims to become one of the "greenest universities in the country. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.3.08 United Press International (UPI)
"Fast way created to ID compound structures"
SAN DIEGO, April 2 (UPI) -- U.S. scientists said they've created new computational protocols that can quickly determine the structure of unknown natural compounds. The University of California-San Diego researchers said their technology cuts the time it takes to determine the structure of peptides derived from natural compounds from six months or a year to as little as one day. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.3.08 CheckBiotech.org
"UC San Diego researchers eliminate drug discovery bottleneck"
Determining the structure of unknown natural compounds is a slow and expensive part of drug screening and development but this may now change thanks to a new combination of experimental and computational protocols developed at the University of California, San Diego and presented at RECOMB 2008 (Research in Computational Molecular Biology) on March 31 in Singapore. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.3.08 Medical News Today
"A New Tool In The Search Of 'The Next Cyclosporine' Presented At RECOMB 2008"
Determining the structure of unknown natural compounds is a slow and expensive part of drug screening and development - but this may now change thanks to a new combination of experimental and computational protocols developed at the University of California, San Diego and presented at RECOMB 2008 (Research in Computational Molecular Biology) on March 31 in Singapore. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.1.08 Scientist Live
"Aiding drug discovery"
Determining the structure of unknown natural compounds is a slow and expensive part of drug screening and development - but this may now change thanks to a new combination of experimental and computational protocols developed at the University of California, San Diego and presented at RECOMB 2008 (Research in Computational Molecular Biology) on March 31 in Singapore. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.1.08 PhysOrg.com
"Researchers eliminate drug discovery bottleneck"
Determining the structure of unknown natural compounds is a slow and expensive part of drug screening and development but this may now change thanks to a new combination of experimental and computational protocols developed at the University of California, San Diego and presented at RECOMB 2008 (Research in Computational Molecular Biology) on March 31 in Singapore. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.1.08 Genetic Engineering News
"UC San Diego researchers eliminate drug discovery bottleneck"
Determining the structure of unknown natural compounds is a slow and expensive part of drug screening and development but this may now change thanks to a new combination of experimental and computational protocols developed at the University of California, San Diego and presented at RECOMB 2008 (Research in Computational Molecular Biology) on March 31 in Singapore. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.1.08 Science Daily
"Drug Discovery Bottleneck Eliminated With New Protocol"
Determining the structure of unknown natural compounds is a slow and expensive part of drug screening and development -- but this may now change thanks to a new combination of experimental and computational protocols developed at the University of California, San Diego and presented at RECOMB 2008 (Research in Computational Molecular Biology) in Singapore. Related Jacobs School Link »

3.26.08 Lockergnome.com (tech blog)
"Need New Look? Online Makeover Is Fan-Taaz-Tic"
Thanks to a Jacobs School startup company whose site, Taaz.com went live today, the cosmetics counter isnt the only place to try out the latest makeup trends. The new way is easier, faster, and much more private. Anyone with a digital photograph can now apply more than 4,000 makeup products with the click of a mouse. Its all at taaz.com the creation of two Jacobs School computer scientists turned entrepreneurs. Related Jacobs School Link »

3.24.08 ZDNet
"How to try 4,000 makeup products online"
Two researchers of the Jacobs School of Engineering at the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) have used their skills in computer graphics to build a new free service on the web named Taaz. According to the computer scientists, Taaz is derived from the Hindi word Taaza, meaning fresh, and related to the word Taj, which means crown. This free and fun service allows women to try more than 4,000 makeup products with the click of a mouse. Taaz users just have to upload a p... Related Jacobs School Link »

3.24.08 New York Times
"Replacing Wire With Laser, Sun Tries to Speed Up Data"
Sun Microsystems is trying to do for computing what all the kings horses and men failed to do for Humpty Dumpty. For decades, the semiconductor industry has broken silicon wafers into smaller chips to improve manufacturing yields. Suns partners on the project are Stanford and the University of California, San Diego, and two silicon photonics firms, Luxtera and Kotura. The Sun bid was chosen over three competing teams from Inteland Hewlett-Packard; I.B.M.; and the Ma...

3.22.08 San Diego Union Tribune
"Seed money to grow 'clean' startups"
In a collaboration with UCSD's von Liebig Center for Entrepreneurism and Technology Advancement, the city of San Diego plans to provide $140,000 in seed money to accelerate development of environmentally friendly clean technologies. Related Jacobs School Link »

3.3.08 Sacramento Bee
"UC to turn Capitol Park even greener on Tuesday"
Capitol Park is usually a pretty green place anyway, but the University of California will add to the "green" theme by showing off its sustainability innovations. UC San Diego researchers will show how microweather stations help make smart decisions about how to design and operate buildings, manage irrigation and monitor air pollution exposure. Related Jacobs School Link »

3.3.08 PhysOrg.com
"From 2-D pictures to 3 dimensions"
Your pictures of the Grand Canyon, Times Square or other destinations may be pretty good, but wouldn't it be nice to show them off in three dimensions? An award-winning 3-D reconstruction algorithm designed by a team of computer science researchers from UC-San Diego brings this dream within the grasp of reality. Related Jacobs School Link »

2.22.08 KPBS FM radio
"Hopping Robot is a Springboard for Student Engineers"
San Diego is a hotbed of ideas in science and medicine. Some of the nation's most successful biotech companies are here. When those companies want fresh ideas, they often turn to the young minds at UC San Diego. It's "Engineer's Week" on campus. KPBS reporter Andrew Phelps visited an "extreme science fair." He has this report. Related Jacobs School Link »

2.18.08 AZoBuild.com
"Sea Cliff Erosion, Hemp Construction Materials and More to be Presented at UCSD Engineering Conferen"
Sea cliff erosion prediction, an automatic cameraman, wall boards made from hemp and plant-based glues, computers with common sense, origami optics, privacy-preserving surveillance systems, the strength of toucan beaks, and stem cell control with nano-science are just a few of the more than 250 research projects from every corner of the engineering world that will be presented by UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering graduate students on Thursday 21 February 2008 at Research Expo... Related Jacobs School Link »

2.13.08 Financial Times
"Will we be able to tell reality from artificial imagery?"
There have been other, startling, developments. Henrik Wann Jensen of the University of California at San Diego is an expert in developing images in which light interacts with other materials - the patterns of light and shade created as sunlight filters through a glass of brandy, for example. Now, he has built a mathematical model based on the absorbtion and reflection of light which can create the image of a material when given its constituents. And it works in reverse: given an ima... Related Jacobs School Link »

2.6.08 Chronicle of Higher Education
"Talking Back to Teacher"
Interactive slides, digital notes, and student blogs about study tips help revitalize the classroom lecture. Beth Simon, a faculty member in computer science and engineering at San Diego, says, "I've even had students submit 'I'm lost.' That's been great. Then we can go over just what the confusion is." But what if students could get and submit inked slides on whatever computer they owned? Ms. Simon and her San Diego colleague William G. Griswold decided to try that with a progr... Related Jacobs School Link »

2.1.08 Scientific Computing World
"The life puzzle solver"
Like many mathematicians Pavel Pevzner likes to solve puzzles. The puzzles he has chosen to solve are those of the biological world concerning the very basic stuff of life itself; proteins and DNA. Related Jacobs School Link »

2.1.08 InfoWorld
"Spyware forum: Computer users cause major problems"
Computer Science professor Stefan Savage is quoted from a talk he gave in Washington, DC at a security conference: "In addition to problems caused by users, there's a healthy underground market for the kinds of data compromised by spyware and other malware, said Stefan Savage, director of the Collaborative Center for Internet Epidemiology and Defenses at the University of California in San Diego. The center monitored a popular malware-trading IRC forum for about six months in 2006 and...

1.25.08 San Diego Union Tribune
"UCSD project is lauded for startup help"
The William J. von Liebig Center at the University of California San Diego is a model in how to promote the commercialization of discoveries made in the university's classrooms and laboratories, according to a national study released yesterday. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.24.08 Centre Daily Times
"Kauffman Foundation Analyzes New Approach to Moving University Innovations to Market"
An emerging approach to identifying, funding and commercializing university-based innovation is proving quite effective at seeding new companies, according to research conducted by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation and the Max Planck Institute of Economics. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.24.08 FinancialContent.com
"Filling Seed-Stage Funding Gap"
According to the Kauffman Foundation, proof of concept centers are an effective vehicle to help launch the commercialization of university innovation and to fill the seed-stage funding gap for new technologies. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.24.08 Charlotte News & Observer
"Kauffman Foundation to form network to facilitate proof of concept center development"
An emerging approach to identifying, funding and commercializing university-based innovation is proving quite effective at seeding new companies. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.22.08 UCSD Guardian
"New Campus Construction Goes Greener"
UCSD's 1,200-acre campus: cool ocean breezes caress joggers along Torrey Pines, the Eucalyptus forest peppers passing students with shade and Regents Lot bakes drivers in its desert heat. A team of campus scientists will finish a complete weather monitoring project later this year studying these different microclimates in the hopes of making UCSD more environmentally friendly. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.11.08 EE Times
"UC Claims EUV source breakthrough"
A new, cheaper laser light source for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography has been patented by the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) in cooperation with Cymer Inc.--a maker of laser illumination sources for photolithography systems. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.10.08 San Diego Union Tribune
"Atmospheric ambition: UCSD sensors will monitor campus weather, adjusting water, energy use to fit c"
When the summer sun bakes the upper campus at UC San Diego, it's probably time to turn on the air conditioning. But for university buildings closest to the ocean, temperatures might be cool enough to open vents and windows and let breezes do the work for free. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.9.08 Physorg.com
"Researchers create enhanced light sources for lithography"
A breakthrough discovery at UC San Diego may help aid the semiconductor industrys quest to squeeze more information on chips to accelerate the performance of electronic devices. Related Jacobs School Link »

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