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12.20.06 CBS News
"Sustainability Gains Status On Campuses"
CBS picked up the Christian Science Monitor article by Ron Scherer, who wrote that somewhere in the curriculum, most colleges and universities include Henry David Thoreau. Now, many of them are trying to emulate him. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.19.06 Christian Science Monitor
"Sustainability gains status on US campuses"
Somewhere in the curriculum, most colleges and universities include Henry David Thoreau. Now, many of them are trying to emulate him. . . UCSD has identified campus rooftops where it can install 500 kilowatts of solar panels, which equals the power needed for 325 homes. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.16.06 Time of London
"Breakthroughs, tips and trends: Bullet-Proof Teeth"
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a lightweight material for fillings, crowns and bridges that is four times stronger than normal by incorporating the same fibres that are used to manufacture bullet-proof vests. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.10.06 MedicoNews
"How Movement Lubricates Bone Joints"
Taking a cue from machines that gently flex patients knees to help them recover faster from joint surgery, bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego have shown that sliding forces applied to cartilage surfaces prompt cells in that tissue to produce molecules that lubricate and protect joints. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.9.06 North County Times
"Mars attack: UCSD professor's novel sees parallel in Mayan culture, future plague"
The idea is pure science fiction. A NASA mission has collected contaminated soil from Mars and is headed back to Earth. With the university that helped design the capsule blinded by grant money, one professor's warnings of a faulty hatch were ignored, and now the entire planet is in peril as an unstoppable plague hurtles onward. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.8.06 Playfuls
"Study May Lead To Better Dental Composites"
A U.S. scientist has developed ultra-strong fiber-reinforced polymer composites for industrial applications that he says might also be used in dentistry. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.8.06 Medgadget
"Kevlar-like Dental Composites"
Dr. Vistasp Karbhari, a professor of structural engineering at UC San Diego, has quadrupled the strength of dental composites, thanks to a material similar to kevlar. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.7.06 United Press International
"Study may lead to better dental composites"
A U.S. scientist has developed ultra-strong fiber-reinforced polymer composites for industrial applications that he says might also be used in dentistry. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.7.06 Monsters and Critics
"Study may lead to better dental composites"
(UPI) -- A U.S. scientist has developed ultra-strong fiber-reinforced polymer composites for industrial applications that he says might also be used in dentistry. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.7.06 Daily India
"Study may lead to better dental composites"
(UPI) -- A U.S. scientist has developed ultra-strong fiber-reinforced polymer composites for industrial applications that he says might also be used in dentistry. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.7.06 St Tammany
"Study may lead to better dental composites"
A U.S. scientist has developed ultra-strong fiber-reinforced polymer composites for industrial applications that he says might also be used in dentistry. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.6.06 e Max Health
"Fibers Used in Bullet-Proof Vests Quadruple Toughness of Dental Composites"
Vistasp Karbhari, a professor of structural engineering at UC San Diego, has developed fiber-reinforced polymer composites as strong, lightweight materials for aerospace, automotive, civil and marine applications, so he thought, "If they work so well in highway bridges, why not dental bridges."... Related Jacobs School Link »

12.6.06 Physorg.com
"Fibers used in bullet-proof vests quadruple toughness of dental composites"
In a paper scheduled for publication in Dental Materials, Karbhari and Howard Strassler, a professor and director of Operative Dentistry at the University of Maryland Dental School, report the results of detailed engineering tests on dental composites containing glass fibers as well as the type of polyethylene fibers used in bullet-proof vests. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.6.06 CC News
"How movement lubricates bone joints"
Taking a cue from machines that gently flex patients knees to help them recover faster from joint surgery, bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego have shown that sliding forces applied to cartilage surfaces prompt cells in that tissue to produce molecules that lubricate and protect joints. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.5.06 Spirit India
"Arthritis : How movement lubricates bone joints"
Researchers have shown that sliding forces applied to cartilage surfaces prompt cells in that tissue to produce molecules that lubricate and protect joints, an important step toward their goal of eventually growing joint tissue for transplantation. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.5.06 Monsters and Critics
"t lubrication and protection studied"
(UPI) -- U.S. scientists say sliding forces applied to cartilage surfaces prompt cells in the tissue to produce molecules that lubricate and protect joints. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.5.06 United Press International
"Joint lubrication and protection studied"
U.S. scientists say sliding forces applied to cartilage surfaces prompt cells in the tissue to produce molecules that lubricate and protect joints. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.5.06 Science Daily
"Sliding Forces Applied To Cartilage Surfaces Prompt Production Of Lubricating Molecules"
Taking a cue from machines that gently flex patients' knees to help them recover faster from joint surgery, bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego have shown that sliding forces applied to cartilage surfaces prompt cells in that tissue to produce molecules that lubricate and protect joints. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.5.06 Physorg.com
"How movement lubricates bone joints"
Taking a cue from machines that gently flex patients knees to help them recover faster from joint surgery, bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego have shown that sliding forces applied to cartilage surfaces prompt cells in that tissue to produce molecules that lubricate and protect joints. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.5.06 Daily India
"Joint Lubrication and protection studied"
(UPI) -- U.S. scientists say sliding forces applied to cartilage surfaces prompt cells in the tissue to produce molecules that lubricate and protect joints. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.5.06 Biology Daily
"How movement lubricates bone joints"
Researchers have shown that sliding forces applied to cartilage surfaces prompt cells in that tissue to produce molecules that lubricate and protect joints, an important step toward their goal of eventually growing joint tissue for transplantation. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.5.06 Bright Surf
"How movement lubricates bone joints"
Taking a cue from machines that gently flex patients knees to help them recover faster from joint surgery, bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego have shown that sliding forces applied to cartilage surfaces prompt cells in that tissue to produce molecules that lubricate and protect joints. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.5.06 Biocompare
"How Movement Lubricates Bone Joints"
Sliding forces applied to cartilage surfaces prompt production of lubricating molecules... Related Jacobs School Link »

12.5.06 First Science News
"How movement lubricates bone joints"
Sliding forces applied to cartilage surfaces prompt production of lubricating molecules. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.5.06 Medicine World
"How Movement Lubricates Bone Joints"
Taking a cue from machines that gently flex patients knees to help them recover faster from joint surgery, bioengineering scientists at UC San Diego have shown that sliding forces applied to cartilage surfaces prompt cells in that tissue to produce molecules that lubricate and protect joints. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.5.06 News Guide
"How movement lubricates bone joints"
Sliding forces applied to cartilage surfaces prompt production of lubricating molecules. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.5.06 Vidyya Medocal News Service
"How movement lubricates bone joints"
Taking a cue from machines that gently flex patients knees to help them recover faster from joint surgery, bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego have shown that sliding forces applied to cartilage surfaces prompt cells in that tissue to produce molecules that lubricate and protect joints. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.4.06 Medscape
"Continuous Passive Motion Causes Chondrocyte Production of Joint Lubricant"
(Reuters Health) Dec 04 - Continuous passive motion (CPM), a rehabilitation technique used after various orthopedic operations, stimulates chondrocyte production of proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), a molecule found in synovial fluid with putative lubricating and chondroprotective properties. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.4.06 Earth Times
"Joint lubrication and protection studied"
SAN DIEGO, Dec. 5 U.S. scientists say sliding forces applied to cartilage surfaces prompt cells in the tissue to produce molecules that lubricate and protect joints. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.1.06 National Geographic Magazine
"Power Beak"
It seems a wonder that toucans don't fall on their faces, so enormous are the beaks of these South American birds. UCSD materials scientist Marc Meyers is investigating how the construction of toucan beaks could be adapted by the automotive and avaiation industries. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.21.06 TechNewsWorld
"Second Life Target of Self-Replicating Worm"
Stefan Savage comments on a self-replicating worm in the virtual world Second Life. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.20.06 Evolution Diary
"Novel experiment documents evolution of genome in near-real time"
A team led by bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego report in the November issue of Nature Genetics rapid evolutionary changes in a bacterial genome, observed in near-real time over a few days. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.19.06 TS Policy Review
"Genome Evolution Documented In Near Real Time"
". . . if the skeptics could witness evolution actually occurring, as we did, I think they'd be more likely to believe that it's not just a theory."... Related Jacobs School Link »

11.16.06 Rootly
"Novel experiment documents evolution of genome in near-real time"
UCSD bioengineers report in the November issue of Nature Genetics rapid evolutionary changes in a bacterial genome, observed in near-real time over a few days. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.15.06 Advances in Physiology Education
"The Physiology Teacher"
Shu Chien, professor of bioengineering and medicine, was selected as the Tau Beta Pi Professor of the Year by student members of the Tau Beta Honor Society. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.14.06 Genetic Engineering News
"Genomatica Patents Main Component in Metabolic Engineering System"
The origins of the technology are based on research at the University of California, San Diego in the laboratory of Bernhard O. Palsson, Ph.D., the lead inventor on the patent. "Bringing together computational design tools with evolutionary engineering principles in this manner is opening a new dimension in Metabolic Engineering, says Dr. Palsson. We now have the ability to produce stable strains that can self-optimize in a processing environment, something which has not previou... Related Jacobs School Link »

11.13.06 Scientific American
"Scientific American 50 - 2006 winners"
Nanotube researchers are also constantly breaking new ground. Prabhakar R. Bandaru of the University of California, San Diego, and his coworkers there and at Clemson University demonstrated a radically new kind of nanotube-based transistor. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.9.06 Check Biotech
"Watching bacteria evolve in the lab: Ethanol- and antibiotic-producing microbes"
Using rapid new DNA-sequencing technologies, University of California-San Diego researchers followed evolutionary changes in E. coli grown under stressful conditions. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.9.06 Technology Review
"Watching Bacteria Evolve in the Lab"
Tracking rapid genetic changes will help researchers engineer ethanol- and antibiotic-producing microbes. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.9.06 Genomics & Proteomics magazine
"Experiment Documents Evolution of Genome in Near-Real Time"
A team led by scientists at UC San Diego report in the November issue ofNature Geneticsrapid evolutionary changes in a bacterial genome, observed in near-real time over a few days. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.8.06 The Japan Times
"NATURAL SELECTIONS: Rationality again on rack of 'faith'"
How can certain events that took place in 17th-century Italy have much relevance to those of the 21st?... Related Jacobs School Link »

11.7.06 Bioresearch Online
"Genome: Novel Experiment Documents Evolution Of Genome In Near-Real Time"
Researchers identified all the changes in a bacterium's complete set of genes during a 44-day evolution experiment. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.7.06 Bora Zivkovic: My Picks from Science Daily
"Novel Experiment Documents Evolution Of Genome In Near-real Time"
A team led by bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego report in the November issue of Nature Genetics rapid evolutionary changes in a bacterial genome, observed in near-real time over a few days. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.6.06 Scenta
"Genome evolution in near-real time"
A bioengineering team has reported rapid evolutionary changes in a bacterial genome, observed in near-real time over a few days. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.6.06 EARTH Times
"Study Published in Nature Genetics by UCSD Utilizes SEQUENOM MassARRAY System"
"We are proud that the analytical sensitivity of Sequenom's technology has demonstrated the feasibility of monitoring bacterial evolution," stated Charles Cantor, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer of Sequenom, Inc. "This is an essential step in the process of understanding the emergence of new pathogens and the acquisition of antibiotic resistance factors."... Related Jacobs School Link »

11.6.06 Tech News
"Novel experiment documents evolution of genome in near-real time"
A team led by bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego report in the November issue of Nature Genetics rapid evolutionary changes in a bacterial genome, observed in near-real time over a few days. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.6.06 PaleoBlog
"Evolution of Genome in Near-Real Time"
"Paleontologists look at the fossil record to study how evolution of dinosaurs and other animals occurred over millions of years, but in the case of the E. coli bacterium, new technology has given us the ability to observe evolution as it is occurring over a matter of days," said Bernhard . Palsson, professor of bioengineering at UCSD. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.6.06 Bright Surf
"Novel experiment documents evolution of genome in near-real time"
A team led by bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego report in the November issue of Nature Genetics rapid evolutionary changes in a bacterial genome, observed in near-real time over a few days. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.6.06 Science Daily
"Novel Experiment Documents Evolution Of Genome In Near-real Time"
A team led by bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego report in the November issue of Nature Genetics rapid evolutionary changes in a bacterial genome, observed in near-real time over a few days. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.6.06 Biology News net
"Novel experiment documents evolution of genome in near-real time"
A team led by bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego report in the November issue of Nature Genetics rapid evolutionary changes in a bacterial genome, observed in near-real time over a few days. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.6.06 PhysOrg - PDA version
"Novel experiment documents evolution of genome in near-real time"
A team led by bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego report in the November issue of Nature Genetics rapid evolutionary changes in a bacterial genome, observed in near-real time over a few days. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.6.06 NimbleGen Systems Inc.
"Novel Experiment Documents Evolution of Genome in"
A team led by bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego report in the November issue of Nature Genetics rapid evolutionary changes in a bacterial genome, observed in near-real time over a few days... Related Jacobs School Link »

11.6.06 Machines Like Us
"Novel experiment documents evolution of genome in near-real time"
A team led by bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego report in the November issue of Nature Genetics rapid evolutionary changes in a bacterial genome, observed in near-real time over a few days. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.6.06 Technology Trading Exchange
"Novel experiment documents evolution of genome in near-real time"
A team led by bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego report in the November issue of Nature Genetics rapid evolutionary changes in a bacterial genome, observed in near-real time over a few days. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.6.06 Paleontology News
"Novel Experiment Documents Evolution of Genome in Near-Real Time"
A team led by bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego report in the November issue of Nature Genetics rapid evolutionary changes in a bacterial genome, observed in near-real time over a few days. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.6.06 The Biochemical Society
"Genome evolution in near-real time"
team led by bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego report rapid evolutionary changes in a bacterial genome, observed in near-real time over a few days. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.5.06 Biocompare
"Novel Experiment Documents Evolution Of Genome In Near-Real Time"
Researchers identified all the changes in a bacterium's complete set of genes during a 44-day evolution experiment. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.5.06 Richard Dawkins.Net
"Experiment documents evolution of genome in near-real time"
A team led by bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego report in the November issue of Nature Genetics rapid evolutionary changes in a bacterial genome, observed in near-real time over a few days. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.5.06 Scientific Front Line
"Novel Experiment Documents Evolution of Genome in Near-Real Time"
A team led by bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego report in the November issue of Nature Genetics rapid evolutionary changes in a bacterial genome, observed in near-real time over a few days. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.5.06 Newsvine
"Novel experiment documents evolution of genome in near-real time"
A team led by bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego report in the November issue of Nature Genetics rapid evolutionary changes in a bacterial genome, observed in near-real time over a few days. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.3.06 National Institute of General Medical Sciences
"Watching a Genome Evolve"
A team led by bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego report in the November issue of Nature Genetics rapid evolutionary changes in a bacterial genome, observed in near-real time over a few days. Related Jacobs School Link »

11.1.06 Science & Spirit Magazine
"Fast-Forwarding Evolution"
In a mere 44 days, UCSDbioengineering researchers Bernhard Palsson and Christopher Herring helped to coax evolutionary changes from a sample of E. coli bacteria. Related Jacobs School Link »

10.20.06 ASEE PRISM
"Get SMART"
Deborah Goshorn, a 2006 SMART scholarship winner from UCSD, is featured on a PRISM article about this U.S. Department of Defense scholarship program. Related Jacobs School Link »

10.9.06 AAAS Science Update & podcast
"Rail Laser: Lasers may help spot hidden track damage that causes train derailments."
Bob Hirshon: This tapping may sound like an old-fashioned news ticker, but it's actually a state-of-the-art laser system for inspecting train tracks. Structural engineer Francesco Lanza di Scalea of the University of California at San Diego is leading the development team. Related Jacobs School Link »

9.27.06 The Scientist
"Scientist to Watch: Trey Ideker"
Stranded with a blown-out rudder in the middle of Los Angeles' shipping lanes last summer, Trey Ideker drifted for three hours before he could repair his sailboat and get back on course. It was one of the few times someone might call him rudderless. Related Jacobs School Link »

9.17.06 Los Angeles Times
"Most L.A. Buildings Not Checked for Northridge Quake Damage"
Less than 20% of steel-frame mid- and high-rise buildings in Los Angeles have been inspected for possible damage caused by the 1994 Northridge earthquake despite evidence that the temblor weakened the buildings' structural support. Story quotes UCSD Jacobs School Structural Engineering professorChia Ming Uang.

9.15.06 San Diego Union Tribune
"Small steps can help fight global warming"
Global warming is starting to get personal in San Diego County. As dire omens about climate change grab the public's attention, efforts are ramping up across the region to deal with a threat that until recent months failed to capture much interest outside scientific circles. A key player in the San Diego Children's Museum project was Paul Linden, the chairman of the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department at UCSD. To help with the design, he modeled air currents in downtown San Diego.

9.11.06 National Geographic Network
"LA's Future Quake"
What would happen if a 7.7 earthquake slammed into Los Angeles, a city of 11 million people, unleashing shock waves traveling at 7000 miles per hour? For the first time, Explorer will follow a computer simulation of this earthquake. Related Jacobs School Link »

9.6.06 National Geographic Network
"LA's Future Quake"
What would happen if a 7.7 earthquake slammed into Los Angeles, a city of 11 million people, unleashing shock waves traveling at 7000 miles per hour? For the first time, Explorer will follow a computer simulation of this earthquake. The results are shocking and totally unexpected. The way we picture "The Big One" will never be the same. Related Jacobs School Link »

9.1.06 Scientific American
"Plan B for Energy"
If efficiency improvements and incremental advances in today's technologies fail to halt global warming, could revolutionary new carbon-free energy sources save the day? Don't count on it--but don't count it out, either...

8.31.06 Wire News
"Smart Buildings Make Smooth Moves"
What if buildings could function like living systems, altering their shapes in response to changing weather conditions or the way people use them? That's the vision of a new breed of architects who are working on what they think is the future of architecture -- "responsive structures" that observe their internal and external environment and change form to suit any situation. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.25.06 Science Daily
"New Ultrasonic Technology Could Help Prevent Train Derailments"
Researchers at the Universityof California, San Diego have developed a new technique they said is better able than currently used technology to find defects in steel railroad tracks. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.24.06 The Engineer Online
"Sounding out track defects"
Researchers at the Universityof California, San Diego have developed a new technique they said is better able than currently used technology to find defects in steel railroad tracks. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.23.06 CONNECT Newsletter
"First Annual UCSD $50K Entrepreneurship Competition"
In a rundown of upcoming events, the online and email newsletter notes that the Jacobs School of Engineering and its von Liebig Center are co-sponsoring a business-plan competition starting Sept. 28.

8.23.06 San Diego Union-Tribune
"Emergency training now more high-tech"
Science reporter Bruce Lieberman reports on the Aug. 22 disaster drill at Calit2 and the challenge of developing technologies such as WIISARD's to help first responders at the scene of a mass-casualty emergency. ECE professor Ramesh Rao is quoted.

8.23.06 Los Angeles Times
"Seeking Better Ways to Test Quake Safety"
Sharon Berstein reports that California scientists are applying strong forces to life-size replicas of structures to get a better idea of what will survive a big earthquake. Dean Frieder Seible is quoted on the value of shake tests like the 7-story building test recently at UCSD's Englekirk Center..

8.23.06 Technology Horizons
"Tapping on the rails"
Researchers at the Universityof California, San Diego led by engineering professor Francesco Lanza di Scalea have developed a new technique that can find defects in steel railway tracks. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.22.06 Physorg.com
"New ultrasonic technology could help prevent train derailments"
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a new technique they said is better able than currently used technology to find defects in steel railroad tracks, including hard-to-find internal cracks that can break under the weight of passing trains. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.22.06 Scientific Frontline
"New Crack-Detection Technology Could Help Prevent Many Train Derailments"
Researchers at the Universityof California, San Diego have developed a new technique they said is better able than currently used technology to find defects in steel railroad tracks. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.22.06 AZoM
"New Technology to Find Defects in Steel Railroad Tracks"
Defects in the rail account for about one-fourth of the 1,000 annual track-caused train derailments in the U.S. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.22.06 Innovations Report
"New Ultrasonic technology could help prevent train derailments"
Researchers have developed a new technique they said is better able than currently used technology to find defects in steel railroad tracks. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.22.06 New Scientist
"Laser 'tapping' reveals cracks in rail tracks"
A machine that "taps" on railroad tracks using laser pulses to check for dangerous internal cracking is being tested by the US Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). The laser pulses create ultrasonic waves that travel through rails at high speed. This means the device can scan for cracks while being pulled along a rail track at up to 112 kilometres (70 miles) per hour much faster than existing equipment. The machine identifies microscopic fractures by monitoring the strength of ultra... Related Jacobs School Link »

8.14.06 San Diego Business Journal
"BioRenewable Looking to Clean Up on Clean Technologies"
Katie Weeks reports on efforts in San Diego to develop "clean" energy technologies. She quotes Jacobs School dean Frieder Seible, and mentions two projects that ECE professor Deli Wang is submitting for seed funding to the von Liebig Center. Both of Wang's innovations arebased on nanowires; "one improves the efficiency of solar panels, while the other enhances the performance of machines already on the market that turn alcohol into electricity," reports the article.

8.10.06 Medical News Today
"New Explanation For The Cause Of Atherosclerosis: The Acidity Theory"
Recent findings were reported by a team of scientists at the University of California, San Diego, linking mechanical forces with structural and biochemical changes in blood vessel cells that could explain why atherosclerotic lesions form preferentially at branches of coronary arteries. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.9.06 National Geographic Network
"Explorer: Outsmarting Terror"
In a post-9/11 era, finding the essential innovations to fight terror is a primary concern. As the world's leading terrorists infiltrate our society, Explorer charges to the frontline to look at cutting edge technological devices that are being built tooutsmart terrorists before they attack. By simulating real-threat scenarios, Explorer shows viewers how the anti-terror industry is working to intercept and prevent potential terror attacks. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.8.06 Bright Surf
"Researchers devise new tools to help pinpoint treatments for heart failure"
Scientists studying heart cells have devised a new way to visualize and quantify the rise and fall in the activity of a key enzyme linked to heart failure. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.7.06 Biocompare
"Researchers Devise New Tools To Help Pinpoint Treatments For Heart Failure"
Scientists studying heart cells have devised a new way to visualize and quantify the rise and fall in the activity of a key enzyme linked to heart failure. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.7.06 Med Compare
"Researchers Devise New Tools To Help Pinpoint Treatments For Heart Failure"
Scientists studying heart cells have devised a new way to visualize and quantify the rise and fall in the activity of a key enzyme linked to heart failure. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.1.06 Slashdot
"UCSD Biometric Vending Machine"
From the tracking-your-soda-habits dept.

7.31.06 Contactless news
"Grad students in San Diego build biometric vending machine"
A group of grad students at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) are in the process of creating what one of the students calls the "most over-designed soda machine in the world."...

7.24.06 KPCC AirTalk
"AirTalk at the U.S.-Mexico Border"
In a special two-hour edition of AirTalk on the Los Angeles-based public-broadcasting affiliate KPCC, ECE professor Mohan Trivedi was interviewed live about technologies used for border enforcement, and specifically his Eagle Eyes project that deployed a system fortracking activity below or near a border crossing in Eagle Pass, TX. To listen to comments in the first hour of the special program,click here(Real player required). Related Jacobs School Link »

7.24.06 The Heart.org
"Why is arterial disease worse at vessel branch points?"
Vascular disease may be more aggressive at arterial branch points because of mechanical flow-related stresses that are more complex than those typically seen in straight vessel segments, according to a laboratory study of endothelial cells. The study was published online in Cellular Signalling on February 28, 2006 and is slated for the journal's October 2006 issue. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.23.06 North County Times
"Michigan, UCSD take top honors at sub races"
Teams from the University of Michigan and UC San Diego took top honors in the 2006 Human Powered Submarine Contest, organized by the local chapter of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The contest drew 12 entries from across the country, along with one from Canada and one from the Netherlands. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.19.06 North County Times
"Sub engineers off to the races"
Budding submarine engineers from across North America and Europe gathered at Cal State San Marcos on Wednesday for the opening of the 2006 Human Powered Submarine Contest. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.18.06 Angeio.com
"Beyond Lipids: Understanding The Mechanics Of Atherosclerosis"
Atherosclerotic narrowing and hardening of coronary arteries typically appear first at vessel branches, and a study in the October issue of Cellular Signalling reports that the type of mechanical stretching found at those branches activates a cellular protein known to damage cells. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.13.06 Biology News Net
"Beyond lipids: understanding the mechanics of atherosclerosis"
Atherosclerotic narrowing and hardening of coronary arteries typically appear first at vessel branches, and a study by researchers at UCSD in the October issue of Cellular Signalling reports that the type of mechanical stretching found at those branches activates a cellular protein known to damage cells. The report is the first to link mechanical forces with structural and biochemical changes in blood vessel cells that could explain why atherosclerotic lesions form preferentially at branches... Related Jacobs School Link »

7.13.06 Innovations Report
"Beyond lipids: understanding the mechanics of atherosclerosis"
The findings, which are currently available online on Cellular Signalling's Website, were reported by a team of UCSD scientists as part of an ongoing effort to understand how mechanical forces affect the health of cells that line arteries. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.13.06 Biocompare
"Beyond Lipids: Understanding The Mechanics Of Atherosclerosis"
Atherosclerotic narrowing and hardening of coronary arteries typically appear first at vessel branches, and a study by UCSD researchersin the October issue of Cellular Signalling reports that the type of mechanical stretching found at those branches activates a cellular protein known to damage cells... Related Jacobs School Link »

7.13.06 SFL
"Beyond Lipids: Understanding The Mechanics Of Atherosclerosis"
A report by UCSD researchers in Cellular Signalling is the first to link mechanical forces with structural and biochemical changes in blood vessel cells that could explain why atherosclerotic lesions form preferentially at branches of coronary arteries. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.13.06 Netscape Science
"Beyond Lipids: Understanding The Mechanics Of Atherosclerosis"
UCSD bioengineers have found a link between parallel alignment of stress fibers in blood vessel cells and healthy levels in those cells of a protein called JNK. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.4.06 Dallas Morning News
"South Texas city posts high-tech cameras at border bridge"
AP reporter Alicia Caldwell reports on a UCSD video surveillance system which was deployed on the Camino Real bridge at Eagle Pass, TX... Related Jacobs School Link »

7.3.06 San Diego Business Journal
"Children’s Museum to Tower Above Predecessors"
This report onconstruction of the new San Diego Childrens Museum mentions work by Prof. Paul F. Linden,Blasker professor of environment science and engineering and chair of the Jacobs School Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, in helping to design the green building which includes a natural ventilation system and central glass chimney that serves as a cooling tower.

6.25.06 San Francisco Chronicle
"THE LAST DAYS OF PRIVACY: As technology makes life richer and easier, we leave a trail of informatio"
On the campus of UC San Diego, biometric experts are testing a soda machine that uses both fingerprint and face-recognition technology. The machine is in a lounge for grad students inUCSD's Computer Science and Engineering Building. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.20.06 Medical News Today
"Cells Use Mix-and-Match Approach to Tailor Regulation of Genes"
Pharmaceutical companies are also hoping to develop drugs that selectively block the binding of transcription factors as a way to short-circuit the harmful effects of diseases, and UCSD researchers have reported new findings that could aid that effort. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.19.06 Science Buzz
"Cells Use Mix-and-Match Approach to Tailor Regulation of Genes"
Transcription factors bind to upstream sequences of genes to turn the expression of those genes on or off. A new class of pharmaceuticals are being designed to selectively block that binding and researchers at UCSD report results that could aid that drug-discovery approach. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.19.06 RxPG News
"Human cells use complex system of transcription-factor combinations"
By UCSD Department of Bioengineering Scientists eager to help develop a new generation of pharmaceuticals are studying cellular proteins called transcription factors, which bind to upstream sequences of genes to turn the expression of those genes on or off. Some pharmaceutical companies are also hoping to develop drugs that selectively block the binding of transcription factors as a way to short-circuit the harmful effects of diseases, and researchers at the University of California, San Die... Related Jacobs School Link »

6.18.06 Bioinfo Online
"Cells Use Mix-and-Match Approach to Tailor Regulation of Genes"
Bioengineering researchers at UCSD and two research institutes in Germany report in the June 16 issue of PLoS Computational Biology that transcription factors act not only in isolation, but also in pairs, trios, and combinations of up to 13 to regulate distinct sets of genes. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.17.06 Biology News net
"Cells use mix-and-match approach to tailor regulation of genes"
Some pharmaceutical companies are also hoping to develop drugs that selectively block the binding of transcription factors as a way to short-circuit the harmful effects of diseases, and researchers at the University of California, San Diego on June 16 reported new findings that could aid that effort. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.17.06 Biosingularity
"Cells Use Mix-and-Match Approach to Tailor Regulation of Genes"
Scientists eager to help develop a new generation of pharmaceuticals are studying cellular proteins called transcription factors, which bind to upstream sequences of genes to turn the expression of those genes on or off. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.7.06 San Diego Union Tribune
"Imitation of life: For new ideas in materials and engineering solutions, nature fills the bill"
UCSD materials science professor Marc Meyers is one of many scientists and engineers who study biomimetics a rapidly changing field that looks to nature for engineering innovations. Mimicking nature is not new. After all, the grace of a bird in flight inspired Leonardo da Vinci and the Wright brothers. But today, scientists' ever increasing knowledge of genetics, modern computing and advances in materials science is providing new opportunities to learn from biology and copy it. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.6.06 Wired Magazine
"Be There and Be Square"
Its a cool afternoon in the stylish Beachwood Canyon section of Los Angeles. The Hollywood sign glows in the distance. Fancy cars and oh-so-casually fancy people meander through the winding lanes. It could be a scene from Entourage, except youre not headed to some starlet-studded soiree. No, youre on your way to something far more exotic: Math-Club. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.25.06 Technology Review
"How Cells Thwart Cancer"
A painstakingly constructed network map of yeast's molecular responses to DNA damage is providing a glimpse into how cells might thwart cancer. Since most cancer is caused by the failure of cells to repair DNA damage due to aging, toxins, radiation, and other exposures, researchers can now turn to this new map to help pinpoint which cancer networks to target for therapeutics. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.23.06 Softpedia
"Heal Thyself: How Cells Avoid Becoming Cancerous"
Researchers have described for the first time a web of inter-related responses that cells use to avoid becoming diseased or cancerous after being exposed to a powerful mutagen. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.21.06 Science Daily
"Heal Thyself: Systems Biology Model Reveals How Cells Avoid Becoming Cancerous"
Scientists led by UCSD bioengineering professor Trey Ideker describe in the May 19 issue of Science an elaborate system of gene control that was triggered by chemical damage to DNA. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.20.06 Medical News Today
"How Cells Avoid Becoming Cancerous"
Researchers atUCSD and three other institutions have described for the first time a web of inter-related responses that cells use to avoid becoming diseased or cancerous after being exposed to a powerful chemical mutagen. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.19.06 Biology News Net
"Heal thyself: Systems biology model reveals how cells avoid becoming cancerous"
"This research sheds light on the complexity of DNA repair, and offers an example of how the cellular process stimulates other pathways," said David Schwartz, director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), one of the agencies which funded the study by UCSD bioengineering professor Trey Ideker. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.19.06 Bioresearch Online
"Systems Biology Model Reveals How Cells Avoid Becoming Cancerous"
Researchers at UCSD analyzed the effect of exposure of yeast cells to MMS (methyl-methanesulfonate), a chemical known to cause DNA damage in a manner similar to that of certain mutagens in tobacco smoke. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.19.06 The Scientist
"DNA repair mapped, systems-wide"
Many cellular processes -- including DNA replication and repair, cell cycle control, metabolism, and stress responses -- form an integrated response to DNA damage, according to a report in this week's Science. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.19.06 What's Next in Science and Technology
"How cells avoid becoming cancerous"
Researchers at UCSD have described for the first time a web of inter-related responses that cells use to avoid becoming diseased or cancerous after being exposed to a powerful chemical mutagen. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.18.06 Physorg.com
"Heal thyself: Systems biology model reveals how cells avoid becoming cancerous"
UCSD researchers describe a web of inter-related responses that cells use to avoid becoming diseased or cancerous after being exposed to a powerful chemical mutagen. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.18.06 Biocompare
"Heal Thyself: Systems Biology Model Reveals How Cells Avoid Becoming Cancerous"
Findings from a project led by UCSD bioengineering professor Trey Ideker could be used eventually to develop drugs to boost DNA repair and possibly treat xeroderma pigmentosum, a disease in which the body's ability to repair DNA damage caused by ultraviolet light is disabled. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.18.06 BIO.COM
"New Systems Biology Model Reveals How Cells Repair DNA Damage"
UCSD bioengineering professor Trey Ideker's team uncovered a tangled network of interactions for 30 transcription factors with hundreds of yeast genes. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.18.06 Interest! Alert
"New Systems Biology Model Reveals How Cells Avoid Becoming Cancerous"
Scientists atUCSD and three other institutions have described for the first time a web of inter-related responses that cells use to avoid becoming diseased or cancerous after being exposed to a powerful chemical mutagen. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.9.06 Mongabay.com
"Copying nature could save us energy, study shows"
New technologies that mimic the way insects, plants and animals overcome engineering problems could help reduce our dependence on energy. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.4.06 InfoStor
"Latest Storage News"
The Information Storage Industry Center (ISIC) atthe Jacobs School's Center for Magnetic Recording Research "has formed the first global special interest group to be supported by the ISIC's StorageNetworking.org Initiative," fordata storage professionals who are employed by financial institutions.

4.21.06 New York Times
"Making the Venture Capitalists Play by the Parents' Rules"
In February, Forbes magazine listed Parag Saxena as one of the top 25 U.S. deal makers. But at the end of this month, Saxena will step down as managing partner of Invesco Private Capital, punctuating a major management shake-up. His departure highlights what can happen when members of two exclusive clubs with different rules are forced to share the same dinner table. (Quotes Paul Kedrosky, the executive director of the Jacobs School'svon Liebig Center)...

4.12.06 CBS-5 San Francisco, UPN/KBHK-TV, Bay Area
"SHOCK WAVES: 100 Years After the 1906 Earthquake""
This hour-long TV documentary focuses on the century of progress in understanding the science of earthquakes, increasing public awareness of seismic hazards, earthquake preparedness and mitigation, and demonstrating how earthquakes affect the personal lives, culture, economy and development of northern California. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.8.06 North County Times
"Surprises Aplenty at UCSD's Stuart Collection"
A 180-ton teddy bear fashioned of Pala granite. Talking and singing trees. Neon letters that spell out vices and virtues. These and more than a dozen other creations compose the Stuart Collection, a body of site-specific sculpture that enlivens UC San Diego's sprawling, 1,200-acre campus. The latest commission, "Bear," is the cuddly centerpiece of the Jacobs School of Engineering courtyard. Artist Tim Hawkinson accomplished his own feat of engineering by stacking the boulders and holdin...

4.8.06 North County Times
"The making of a natural sandy beach"
A story by Christina S. Johnson, a science writer for the California Sea Grant program based at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, describes new findings that challenge the common beliefs about where beach sands come from. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.6.06 Chronicle of Philanthropy
"Turning College Students into Lifelong Philanthropists"
Getting college students to become lifelong donors is a challenge for many colleges and universities. At the University of California at San Diego, officials decided that giving students a chance to raise, invest, and distribute charitable funds would help make them loyal donors to their alma mater, as well as to other causes. Among the alumni highlighted is mechanical engineering alumnus Ping Yeh.

4.6.06 San Diego Daily Transcript
"UCSD engineering students place third in competition"
From designing a dorm model that would withstand a Northridge-sized earthquake to creating a chemical-free water filtration system, UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering structural engineering students proved themselves innovative leaders at the 2006 American Society of Civil Engineers' Pacific southwest regional collegiate conference held at UCLA. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.5.06 Physorg.com
"Finding a Better Way to Quiet Noisy Environments"
Researchers at UCSD report in the April 4 issue of the Journal of Sound and Vibration a new mathematical algorithm designed to dramatically improve noise-cancellation technologies that are used to quiet everything from airplane cabins to commercial air conditioning systems. The new technique improves the ability to achieve destructive interference, the generation of anti-noise signals that combine with and destroy unwanted sounds. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.4.06 Photonics.com
"Engineers 'Translate' IR Signals into Many Other Wavelengths"
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have developed a way to "translate" optical fiber signals between the current infrared and a wide range of other bands of light, something only achieved previously with nearly identical wavelengths. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.2.06 San Diego Union Tribune
"Future engineers seek to hold up to simulated 'quake"
Alison Hewitt reports on the pacific regional American Society of Civil Engineers collegiate conference where UCSD structural engineering students placed first in seismic design challenge. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.1.06 Biomedical Computational Review
"The Six Faces of E. Coli"
Biologists favorite bacterium grows almost anywherefrom the human gut to the pounding surf. But E. colis remarkable adaptability apparently stems from being predictable rather than accommodating. In a recent computer simulation, thousands of environments provoked only a handful of shifts in the microbes physiology. Related Jacobs School Link »

3.31.06 Fox 6 News
"UCSD Recognition"
UCSD Ph.D. programs and engineering and medical schools rank among the nation's best in annual U.S. News survey. Related Jacobs School Link »

3.28.06 Physorg.com
"Strings As Structural Elements? Engineers Devise Mathematics For New Age Structures"
Scientists at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have devised two mathematical tools considered to be major contributions to the optimal design of a new generation of deformable bridges, buildings, shape-controllable airplane wings, radio antennas, and other alternatives to current structural technologies. Two reports will be published in the International Journal of Solids and Structures, with the first appearing in the April issue. Related Jacobs School Link »

3.20.06 Genetic Engineering News
"Technology Review Identifies Emerging Technologies That Will Make a Difference"
With new technologies constantly being invented in corporate and academic labs around the world, identifying which ones will transform computing, medicine, telecommunications and business always is a challenge. In "10 Emerging Technologies," a special package in the March/April issue of Technology Review, MIT's magazine of technology, the editors name those that they feel will soon have a significant impact. Related Jacobs School Link »

3.17.06 Technology Review
"Special Report: 10 Emerging Technologies"
Biomedical research these days seems to be all about the "omes": genomes, proteomes, metabolomes. Beyond all these lies the mother of all omes -- or maybe just the ome du jour: the interactome. Every cell hosts a vast array of interactions among genes, RNA, metabolites, and proteins. The impossibly complex map of all these interactions is, in the language of systems biology, the interactome. Trey Ideker, a molecular biotechnologist by way of electrical engineering, has recently begun compari... Related Jacobs School Link »

3.14.06 Hindustan Times
"india must focus on human resources: NRI scientists"
"There is a need for India to invest more in human resources development and change the mindset towards education and inter-disciplinary disciplines like bio-informatics to understand the link between IT and medicine. This would help India benefit from its strength in IT." -- Shankar Subramaniam, UCSD Department of Bioengineering... Related Jacobs School Link »

3.12.06 Los Angeles Times
"Bridges Remain Key Quake Risk"
Californiahas made great strides in protecting its own bridges from earthquakes, however hundreds of bridges maintained by cities and counties across the state remain unfixed.

3.6.06 Northrop Grumman Corp.
"Northrop Grumman and UCSD Complete Research to Increase Unmanned Aerial Vehicle's Capabilities."
Northrop Grummanand UCSDcompleted a study that will enable the MQ-5B Hunter unmanned aerial vehicle to carry additional payloads, increasing its effectiveness for the U.S. Army.

3.3.06 San Diego Union Tribune
"They're always with him"
Don Norcross reports that UCSD structural engineering graduate student Jason Delaneyis close to qualifying for the U.S. marathon team at the 2006 Olympics, after experiencing the tragedy of losing eight of his teammates on a University of Wyoming cross-country team four and a half years ago. The student is researching fiber-reinforced-polymer rehabilitated structures andexemplifies the student-athelete ideal.

3.1.06 Hindustan Times
"Georgia Tech Eyes Hyderabad"
Article on possible Georgia Tech campus in Hyderabad, India, mentions UCSD's role in creating the Indo-U.S. University Network, in a memorandum of understanding signed last December in New Delhi.

3.1.06 Dallas Morning News
"Drivers may be slow to accept safer cars"
Writer Terry Maxon reports on various research efforts to make cars safer, including ECE professor Mohan Trivedi's project to develop "smart"air bagsthat wouldbe much more safely if deployed just before the accident. Trivedi is quoted saying any safety system has to monitor what the driver is doing paying attention, looking away from the road or nodding off.

3.1.06 Science Grid This Week
"The Future of Digital Data"
In a report on the "Expanding Universe of Digital Data Collections" symposium at the 2006 American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual Meeting, Katie Yurkewicz quotes SDSC director Francine Berman saying: "We used to look at compute only and ask what you can do in your local environment and what you need to go outside for. Now we need to look at data like that too. One of the things we see across many communities is the desire to put together different kinds of data to answer bi...

3.1.06 Campus Technology
"New Leadership for Network Research at UCSD"
In its roundup of "Campus Briefs," the magazine reports that "computer scientist Amin Vahdat has taken the reins as director of the University of California-San Diegos Center for Networked Systems (CNS). Vahdat is also an academic participant in the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2)."...

2.24.06 New York Times
"A Page Turner, Real-Life Echoes Included"
Matt Richtel reports on the life of venture capitalist Tom Perkins, and quotes von Liebig Center executive director Paul Kedrosky, who says venture capitalists are "all looking for influence beyond being a glorified banker."...

2.16.06 RxPG News
"Synthetic biology experiment turns up a previously unrecognized gene-expression phenomenon"
By UCSD -- An experiment designed to show how a usually innocuous bacterium regulates the expression of an unnecessary gene for green color has turned up a previously unrecognized phenomenon that could partially explain a feature of bacterial pathogenicity. Related Jacobs School Link »

2.13.06 San Diego Business Journal
"UCSD Database May Aid Startups"
The weekly publication reports that "researchers at UC San Diego are creating a massive database that scientists worldwide will use to identify new genes in microscopic marine life." The report refers to a partnership led by Calit2 and J. Craig Venter Institute. Related Jacobs School Link »

2.10.06 San Diego Union Tribune
"Not-so-heavy metal meets golf"
Startup company in Carlsbad using nanotechnology to make lighter but stronger shafts and club heads. MAE professor Ken Vecchio is a scientific adviser for the company. Related Jacobs School Link »

2.8.06 CONNECT Newsletter
"Calit2 Cyberinfrastructure Project Could Spawn Economic Development, Including New Start-Ups"
Editor Andrea Siedsma reports on the recent linkup between Calit2 and the Venter Institute to form an initiative to build the cyberinfrastructure needed to explore new data in marine microbial genomics. Related Jacobs School Link »

2.8.06 North County Times
"From technical problem to a new company"
Brad Fikes reports on a recent UCSD alumnus who created a new company tomake posting photos online a one-step process, and the article notes that computer scientist Ryan Sit "got advice from UCSD professors Stefan Savage and William G. Griswold."...

1.30.06 CBS-5.com San Francisco
"UC Offers Math, Science Program for Talented Teens"
University of California officials say talented students who love math and science and excel in those subjects have a chance to spend four weeks in residence at a campus this summer to learn more. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.27.06 HPCwire
"The OptIPuter Gets Real"
In the weekly online publication's lead story, editor Michael Feldman asks, "What do you get when you combine one of the most advanced computational infrastructures in the world with one of the most renowned genomic research organizations? We're about to find out. Larry Smarr recently spoke with HPCwire about how OptIPuter technology is poised to transform scientific research and discovery." The Calit2 director and CSE professor is quoted, as are others including SDSC's Phil Papadopoulos, a c... Related Jacobs School Link »

1.26.06 Medical News Today, Medi Lexicon, and Hospitals Worldwide
"Patterns In Genome Organization May Partially Explain How Microbial Cells Work"
The location of genes and other features distributed along chromosomes of bacteria may be fundamentally important to how the microbial cells operate. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.26.06 R&D Magazine
"Photonic Switches Put the Internet on Steroids"
Richard Gaughan reports on the coming revolution in optical networking, and quotes Calit2 director Larry Smarr on the challenges ahead: Theres something deadly wrong with the infrastructure when the natural rate of the PC is so much higher than the bandwidth interconnecting them.

1.25.06 Bioinfo Online
"Computational Biology : Patterns in genome organization may partially explain how microbial cells wo"
The location of genes and other features distributed along chromosomes of bacteria may be fundamentally important to how the microbial cells operate. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.25.06 Biocompare
"Patterns In Genome Organization May Partially Explain How Microbial Cells Work"
The location of genes and other features distributed along chromosomes of bacteria may be fundamentally important to how the microbial cells operate. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.24.06 San Diego Union-Tribune
"Slowdown in venture capital seen in San Diego"
Writer Bruce Bigelow reports on the sluggish nature of venture capital activity in San Diego compared to the national trend, andparaphrases von Liebig Center executive director Paul Kedrosky saying, "San Diego has relatively few startups focused on consumer electronics."...

1.23.06 Information Week
"First the Body, Now the Ocean"
After helping crack the human genome, computer technology, data mining, and optical networking will be put to work to give biologists worldwide a window into ocean life. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.22.06 CBS Evening News
"An Earthquake-Proof Building?"
Story on results of a shake test of a 7-story building at UCSD's Englekirk Center. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.19.06 Chicago Sun-Times
"Colleges Must Make Tech Transfers the Norm"
University of Illinois at Chicago professor William O'Neill writes that UCSD's engineering program has found a successful model for technology transfer, and he goes on to note that "technology transfer is a process by which research findings generated in university laboratories are turned into useful products for society."...

1.16.06 New York Times
"Sharing Broadband to Increase Speed"
John Markoff reports that "Mushroom Networks, which was started at the University of California, San Diego," has built a prototype of "simple wireless systems that make it possible for groups of neighbors to share their D.S.L. or cable Internet connections." Company founder and CSE professor Rene Cruz is quoted.

1.12.06 San Diego Union Tribune
"Companies donate to S.D. universities"
Cymer, a maker of lasers used in the production of semiconductors, awarded $175,000 to the Jacobs School of Engineering Scholars Program at UCSD. The gift was to commemorate Cymer's 20th anniversary, and the money will fund scholarships. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.11.06 TMCnet
"Cymer Pledges $175,000 in Scholarships for UCSD's Jacobs School of Engineering"
Celebrating 20 years of dedication to the industry, Cymer invests in future engineers. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.11.06 San Diego Daily Transcript
"Cymer gives $175K to fund scholarships"
Though celebrating the company's own 20th anniversary, Cymer Inc. (Nasdaq: CYMI, News) gave a gift to someone else last weekend, awarding $175,000 to the Jacobs School of Engineering Scholars Program at the University of California, San Diego. The gift will fund a scholarship and fellowship to an undergraduate and graduate recipient. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.10.06 FreshNews.com
"Cymer Pledges $175,000 in Scholarships for UCSD's Jacobs School of Engineering"
To mark its 20th anniversary, San Diego-based Cymer donates funds to support graduate and undergraduate student fellowships and scholarships.

1.10.06 10 News.com
"UCSD Makes Top 100 Public Colleges List"
Kiplinger's Personal Finance has come out with its Top 100 list of the best values in public universities and UCSD'students can be proud of the fact that their university is near the top of the list of best public colleges when it comes to value.

1.10.06 Yahoo! Financial News
"Cymer Pledges $175,000 in Scholarships for UCSD's Jacobs School of Engineering"
Celebrating 20 years of dedication to the industry, Cymer invests in future engineers (from Business Wire). Related Jacobs School Link »

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