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Jacobs School News

4/24/15
Jacobs School of Engineering Students Receive 2015 NSF Graduate Research Fellowships
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded Graduate Research Fellowships to seven students from the Jacobs School of Engineering. This year, the NSF received approximately 16,500 applications and made 2,000 fellowship award offers. The fellowships provide three years of financial support – including an annual stipend and a cost-of-education allowance to the graduate institution – during a five-year period to individuals pursuing research-based master’s or doctoral degrees in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics.
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Engineering the smallest crack in the world 4/23/15
Engineering the smallest crack in the world
A new procedure will enable researchers to fabricate smaller, faster, and more powerful nanoscale devices ─ and do so with molecular control and precision. Using a single layer of carbon atoms, or graphene, nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have invented a new way of fabricating nanostructures that contain well-defined, atomic-sized gaps. The results from the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering were published in the January issue of the journal Nano Letters. Structures with these well-defined, atomic-sized gaps could be used to detect single molecules associated with certain diseases and might one day lead to microprocessors that are 100 times smaller than the ones in today’s computers.
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'Holey' graphene for energy storage 4/21/15
'Holey' graphene for energy storage
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have discovered a method to increase the amount of electric charge that can be stored in graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon. The research, published recently online in the journal Nano Letters, may provide a better understanding of how to improve the energy storage ability of capacitors for potential applications in cars, wind turbines, and solar power.
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Breast Tumor Stiffness and Metastasis Risk Linked by Molecule's Movement 4/20/15
Breast Tumor Stiffness and Metastasis Risk Linked by Molecule's Movement
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center have discovered a molecular mechanism that connects breast tissue stiffness to tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. The study, published April 20 inNature Cell Biology, may inspire new approaches to predicting patient outcomes and halting tumor metastasis.“We’re finding that cancer cell behavior isn’t driven by just biochemical signals, but also biomechanical signals from the tumor’s physical environment,” said senior author Jing Yang, PhD, associate professor of pharmacology and pediatrics.
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Micromotors. Heart on a chip. Social media epidemiology. A Research Expo recap. 4/20/15
Micromotors. Heart on a chip. Social media epidemiology. A Research Expo recap.
Micromotors that zoom through a mouse’s stomach. Heart tissues on a chip. Analysis of social media posts to prevent an increase in HIV infections. These were only a few of more than 200 posters on display at the Jacobs School’s Research Expo 2015 at the Price Center Ballroom on April 16. 
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Center for Visual Computing launches, poised to make significant contributions to visual computing and imaging technologies 4/20/15
Center for Visual Computing launches, poised to make significant contributions to visual computing and imaging technologies
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have launched the UC San Diego Center for Visual Computing, which brings together experts in computer graphics, computer vision, computational imaging and augmented reality with the goal of making significant, long-term contributions to visual computing and imaging technologies.  
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4/17/15
Alumna, Incoming Student Share Passion for Computer Science and Basketball
There must be something about hoops, Tritons and computer science. Meet Marissa Hing. The 18-year-old high school senior was on campus April 4 to attend Triton Day, when more than 15,000 accepted students and their families converged on UC San Diego to get a taste of everything the university offers its students-to-be. Despite her 5-foot-1-inch height, Hing is also coming to play basketball on an athletic scholarship for the campus NCAA Division II team, after starring since her freshman year at Pinewood High School in Los Altos, Calif.
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4/17/15
Artificial Blood Vessel Lets Researchers Better Assess Clot Removal Devices
Researchers at the School of Medicine and the Institue of Engineering in Medicine at the University of California, San Diego have created an in vitro, live-cell artificial vessel that can be used to study both the application and effects of devices used to extract life-threatening blood clots in the brain. The artificial vessel could have significant implications for future development of endovascular technologies, including reducing the need for animal models to test new devices or approaches.
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