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Jacobs School News

5/29/15
5G Wireless Forum: The Promise and the Peril of Future Wireless Systems
The format for the recent 5G Forum on Next-Generation Wireless Systems and Applications, held at the University of California, San Diego, was a reflection of the two poles — the promise and the peril — that define the future of wireless technology.If all goes according to plan, the next decade of advances in mobile technology promises to transform a vast array of sectors, from government to transportation to public health. It will be possible, for example, to use an array of devices to wirelessly monitor your body for any sign of illness, hold a preliminary e-consultation with your physician should a question arise and then also predict whether or not traffic flow will make you late to your follow-up doctor’s appointment.
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Programming probiotics for early detection of liver cancer metastases 5/27/15
Programming probiotics for early detection of liver cancer metastases
Scientists at the University of California, San Diego and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have described a new method for detecting liver cancer metastases in mice. The approach uses over-the-counter probiotics genetically programmed to produce signals easily detectable in urine when liver cancer metastases are present.
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Power to the Batteries 5/21/15
Power to the Batteries
Better solar panels and wind turbines are important to helping ensure a low-carbon future. But they are not enough. The energy from these intermittent sources must be stored, managed, converted and accessed when it’s needed most. And the cost of the battery systems that do this work needs to drop.This is where the new Sustainable Power and Energy Center at UC San Diego comes in. NanoEngineering professor Shirley Meng is the inaugural director of the center.
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Alumnus Reaches for the Stars 5/21/15
Alumnus Reaches for the Stars
Robert Kolozs, a Jacobs School alumnus, is president of San Diego Composites Inc., a company he cofounded in 2004. The company built and tested more than 1,000 parts for NASA’s Orion spacecraft, a vehicle designed to carry astronauts to destinations in deep space, including an asteroid and Mars. On Dec. 5, Orion launched atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Space Launch Complex for a two-orbit, four-hour test flight. San Diego Composites manufactured everything from the vehicle’s windows to light composite elements connecting the spacecraft’s inner and outer shells. The company also built a key component of the system that would allow Orion’s crew to eject in an emergency.
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Gel filled with nanosponges cleans up MRSA infections 5/18/15
Gel filled with nanosponges cleans up MRSA infections
Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego developed a gel filled with toxin-absorbing nanosponges that could lead to an effective treatment for skin and wound infections caused by MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), an antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This nanosponge-hydrogel minimized the growth of skin lesions on mice infected with MRSA – without the use of antibiotics. The researchers recently published their findings online in Advanced Materials.
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Alumni-led company Tortuga Logic releases toolkit to transform hardware systems developers' approach to security 5/18/15
Alumni-led company Tortuga Logic releases toolkit to transform hardware systems developers' approach to security
Tortuga Logic, a company co-founded by Ryan Kastner, a professor of computer science at the University of California, San Diego, computer science Ph.D. alumnus Jason Oberg and former postdoctoral researcher Jonathan Valamehr, released May 14 a comprehensive toolkit aiming to transform the way hardware designers and system architects test the security of hardware designs.
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Event empowers students to study STEM fields 5/14/15
Event empowers students to study STEM fields
As a ninth grader, Diana has dreamt of being many different things, but an engineer has never been one of them.“I guess it just isn’t something you think could really happen for a lot of people. Those kinds of jobs feel so far away,” she said.She was among 150 students who attended the Empower High School Conference on Saturday, April 25—an event that hopes to make STEM jobs a more realistic career goal for students.By the end of the event, she was enthusiastic: “My favorite part of the day was touring the labs. Seeing all the resources here is definitely inspiring. It makes you feel like you could something really cool,” said Diana.   
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UC San Diego Student Takes Third Place at UC Grad Slam 5/14/15
UC San Diego Student Takes Third Place at UC Grad Slam
In a three-minute TED-style talk, UC San Diego graduate student Alex Phan explained to University of California President Janet Napolitano and a panel of judges how his work holds the potential to transform care for glaucoma patients and lead to better understanding of the disease. Phan was one of 10 graduate students to compete in the first UC-wide Grad Slam tournament, which took place May 4 in Oakland. Phan took third place and received a $1,000 prize for his presentation.The Grad Slam challenges students to take years of academic work and present it to a general audience in just three minutes, without using any jargon or technical lingo. The result is a fun and engaging glimpse at the variety and impact of graduate student work across the University of California. It’s also an opportunity for students to practice communicating their research, a skill of growing necessity as public funding for research and higher education becomes more competitive.
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