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Jacobs School News

Improving Signal Amplification in Semiconductors and Other Optoelectronic Devices 1/27/15
Improving Signal Amplification in Semiconductors and Other Optoelectronic Devices
According to the American Institute of Physics (AIP), a new signal amplification process developed by researchers at the University of California, San Diego is “now poised to fuel new generations of electrical and photonic devices – transforming communications, imaging, and computing.” The researchers in UC San Diego’s Jacobs School of Engineering, led by electrical and computer engineering professor Yuhwa Lo, have discovered a mechanism to amplify signals in optoelectronic systems that is far more efficient than the process long used by the semiconductor industry based on impact ionization.
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Stomach Acid-Powered Micromotors Get Their First Test in a Living Animal 1/26/15
Stomach Acid-Powered Micromotors Get Their First Test in a Living Animal
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have shown that a micromotor fueled by stomach acid can take a bubble-powered ride inside a mouse. These tiny motors, each about one-fifth the width of a human hair, may someday offer a safer and more efficient way to deliver drugs or diagnose tumors. The experiment is the first to show that these micromotors can operate safely in a living animal, said Professors Joseph Wang and Liangfang Zhang of the NanoEngineering Department at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. 
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Temporary Tattoo Offers Needle-Free Way to Monitor Glucose Levels 1/14/15
Temporary Tattoo Offers Needle-Free Way to Monitor Glucose Levels
Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have tested a temporary tattoo that both extracts and measures the level of glucose in the fluid in between skin cells. This first-ever example of the flexible, easy-to-wear device could be a promising step forward in noninvasive glucose testing for patients with diabetes.
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Nanoshaping method points to future manufacturing technology 1/9/15
Nanoshaping method points to future manufacturing technology
A new method that creates large-area patterns of three-dimensional nanoshapes from metal sheets represents a potential manufacturing system to inexpensively mass produce innovations such as "plasmonic metamaterials" for advanced technologies. The metamaterials have engineered surfaces that contain features, patterns or elements on the scale of nanometers that enable unprecedented control of light and could bring innovations such as high-speed electronics, advanced sensors and solar cells.The new method, called laser shock imprinting, creates shapes out of the crystalline forms of metals, potentially giving them ideal mechanical and optical properties using a bench-top system capable of mass producing the shapes inexpensively. Findings are detailed in a research paper appearing Friday (Dec. 12) in the journal Science.
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1/6/15
Structural seismic design expert Nigel Priestley dies
Nigel Priestley, Emeritus Professor in the Department of Structural Engineering at the University of California, San Diego, passed away peacefully on Tuesday Dec. 23 in Christchurch, New Zealand, surrounded by his wife, Jan, and children, after a long battle with cancer.
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Robot solves Rubik's Cube, teaches kids about STEM 1/5/15
Robot solves Rubik's Cube, teaches kids about STEM
Their robot won’t break the world record for solving Rubik’s Cube, but Daryl Stimm and William Mutterspaugh have an even more ambitious goal: using it to get thousands of girls and boys interested in science and technology. The two recent graduates from the University of California, San Diego’s Jacobs School of Engineering are already building Ruku Robot, a kit that students in middle school or high school can assemble to get hands-on experience with the fundamentals of robotics, computer science and engineering. 
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Film Project Highlights Entrepreneurism at UC San Diego and on Torrey Pines Mesa 12/22/14
Film Project Highlights Entrepreneurism at UC San Diego and on Torrey Pines Mesa
A breakthrough today was a crazy idea yesterday. That’s a line from a new film project that documents a student-driven effort at UC San Diego and the research institutions across the Torrey Pines Mesa to help and encourage students to turn ideas and breakthroughs into startup companies. This short documentary film was produced and directed by Dr. Rajesh Grover, an assistant professor at The Scripps Research Institute and a visiting investigator at the  J. Craig Venter Institute in La Jolla, and Kenan Azam, a data scientist in the laboratory of UC San Diego bioengineering professor Shankar Subramaniam.  Both are former leaders of the UC San Diego Entrepreneur Challenge for the academic year 2011-12.
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UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering Launches Center for Extreme Events Research 12/19/14
UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering Launches Center for Extreme Events Research
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have launched a new center of excellence focused on developing better ways to protect buildings, bridges, dams and the rest of the built infrastructure, as well as the human body, from extreme events such as blasts from terrorist attacks, mining explosions, car crashes, sports collisions and natural disasters such as landslides and earthquakes. The Center for Extreme Events Research (CEER) at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering brings together a unique combination of experts in experimental and computational research to tackle these problems. As a result, faculty will be able to develop sophisticated simulation tools and validate them experimentally. 
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